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Today's News

  • Jobs brought them together, music is the key

    Though most of the members of the band Solrevolt have a common background in law enforcement, it’s their music that is the binding factor — not their job.

        In other words, according to band member Rick Drewery, their jobs might have brought them together, but the music is what really matters. And now they have produced their own CD.

  • Man faces more charges after incident at jail

    A Bedford County man, already charged with  attempted capital murder against a police officer, now faces additional charges of attempted malicious wounding and felony assault after an alleged incident at the Bedford Adult Detention Center on March 5.

  • Breaking: Arrests made in death investigation of body found in James River

    Three Waynesboro residents have been charged with conspiracy to commit first degree murder in connection with the death of a Churchville man found dead in the James River March 7.

        Bedford and Augusta County deputies arrested the three suspects today (Wednesday, March 17)  in connection with the death investigation that was initiated when the body of a then-unidentified male was found in the James River at the Snowden Bridge in Big Island. 

  • Carriage Hill undergoes changes

        Carriage Hill is now under new management.

        T. J. M. Properties, of Clearwater, Fla., purchased the retirement community last year. According to Chris Davis, Carriage Hill’s executive director, T. J. M. specializes in assisted living, skilled care and independent living facilities. He said that facilities like Carriage Hill are the heart of what the company does. It currently has 11 facilities and acquiring Carriage Hill was the beginning of an expansion into Virginia. He anticipates having two more by the end of the year.

  • Taking the reins at BMH

    Bedford Memorial Hospital’s new CEO is a familiar face. Patti Jurkus, who took the helm on Feb. 1, first came to Bedford Memorial in December, 1988.

        “I started in human resources,” she said.

        During her time at the hospital, she went back to school and earned her bachelor of science degree in management and development from Bluefield College. Then, she earned her MBA from Liberty University.

  • Council hears budget requests

    Representatives from several local organizations made their pitch to Bedford City Council last Tuesday asking that funding for them be included in the city’s upcoming budget.

        Dan Plattus, office manager of Bedford Main Street, listed numerous changes that the organization has undergone since last year, including a new Web site, a new brand for Centertown — the Bedford Art and Antique District — a new event (2nd Fridays) and a more coordinated effort of downtown merchants working together.

  • State budget still cuts education, health care, public safety

    RICHMOND – After much deliberation, the General Assembly has passed a two-year $82 billion budget that cuts spending on education, health care and public safety to bridge a $4 billion shortfall.

        But the cuts aren’t expected to hit the local school budget as much as originally anticipated.

        “Many previous unimaginable cuts would be necessary to produce a balanced budget,” said Sen. Mary Margaret Whipple of Arlington, who chairs the Virginia Senate Democratic Caucus.

  • Stalin bust controversy reaches into Poland

    The National D-Day Memorial Foundation’s decision to include a bust of Joseph Stalin in its sculpture program has drawn international attention.

  • The census matters

    The 2010 Census questionnaire will arrive at households throughout Virginia from March 15 through 17.  Census Bureau officials ask you to watch for the 10-question form, fill it out and mail it back immediately in the provided, postage-paid envelope. Doing this will save time and money. 

  • Letters

    Interesting take

        Last week’s article and Letters to the editor regarding Bedford County’s school budget were interesting.

        A few years back, the company I work for was near bankruptcy and the employees were asked to take reduced pay and fewer paid holidays instead of more layoffs. We agreed to this because we understood that every remaining employee was necessary for the continued operation of the company. The company survives, I still have a job and continue to pay my county taxes.