.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Restored film shows the evils of war

        The late film director John Huston gave us such classic movies as “Key Largo,” “The African Queen,” and “Treasure of the Sierra Madre.”
        He even did some acting, with a memorable performance in “Chinatown,” the Jack Nicholson classic.
        What most people don’t know, though, is that Huston, during World War II, made three movies for the U.S. Army. Propaganda, to be sure, but he was paid for it, and I suppose he needed the money.

  • Listen to Charlie Kolakowski


        Bedford City Council is now in the process of developing its last city budget. Next May Bedford will have to hold elections for a town council as required by the city’s reversion to town status, slated for July 1, 2013. I’m sure the reversion will take place as scheduled. The members of the Virginia Commission on Local Government seemed pleased with what they saw when they came to Bedford on May 14. They also noted that the sparse attendance at the public hearing they held shows that there is no groundswell of public opposition.

  • Man sentenced on firearms charge

    By Tyler Flynn
    Intern Writer
    News@bedfordbulletin.com

        A Bedford man was sentenced for possession of a firearm by a convicted felon in Bedford Circuit Court Tuesday involving a case in which two dogs were shot and killed.
        John Wayne Surface Sr., 70, was sentenced on the charge related to having shot and killed his neighbor’s two dogs last year.

  • School Board makes cuts; trims budget by $1.5 M to balance

        The Bedford County School Board found $1.5 million in cuts to balance its budget last week.
        The board held a four-hour work session Thursday to consider the budget cuts which were needed after the Bedford County Board of Supervisors cut its increase in local funding from $4.2 million to $2.5 million. The school board had requested the $3.5 million increase.
        Among the cuts made to help balance the budget:
        • No new buses will be purchased in the upcoming fiscal year;

  • Close to 600 attend Memorial Day service

    By Tyler Flynn

    Intern Writer
    news@bedfordbulletin.com

        A special Memorial Day observance was held at the National D-Day Memorial on Monday, May 28 in Bedford.
        The ceremony, entitled “Remembering Their Sacrifice,” honored both current and fallen military personnel from throughout U.S. history who made sacrifices to ensure the nation’s freedom. The program also brought recognition to flight nurses who cared for the injured during World War II.

  • One sailor's day: D-Day honors him at June 6 service

        For over eight years, Eric Montgomery has been on a mission to close the final chapter of his great uncle Amin Isbir’s D-Day story. 
        Coxswain Amin Isbir, a member of the 6th Naval Beach Battalion, was reported killed in action on June 8, 1944.  His great nephew, Eric Montgomery questioned his date of death believing that he had been killed in action on D-Day, June 6, 1944.  Isbir’s commanding officer, Ensign Joe Vaghi, confirmed Montgomery’s suspicions. 

  • Helping Joplin residents ‘Sing Again’

    By Laura Enderson

    Intern Writer
    news@bedfordbulletin.com

        Singer/songwriter Mark Laperle of Bedford, inspired others to “sing again” after the deadly Joplin, Mo., tornado one year ago.
        Last week he was in Joplin to personally deliver that message during a special memorial service in the city.

  • Brooks Food Group announces setbacks; Mail America plans expansion

        While one area business was announcing this week that its local plant could close as the business restructures, another was announcing plans for expansion.
        Brooks Food Group, based out of Bedford, has closed its North Carolina plant and could do the same in Bedford. Meanwhile Mail America, based out of Forest, has announced plans to add 75 jobs over the next three years.

    Brooks Food Group

  • Friends, family and students remember 1st Lieutenant Joshua Booth

    While many see Memorial Day as the kick-off to summer fun, that’s not what the holiday is all about. It was established to remember military men who died in the service of their country. It got its start after the War Between the States to honor the war dead. The wars of the 20th century added more to those ranks.

        This year, a young man named Andrew Pollard and a friend of his rode down from Massachusetts to honor 1st Lieutenant Joshua Booth, a Marine platoon leader who was killed by a sniper in Hadithah, Iraq on Oct. 17, 2006.

  • Friends, family and students remember 1st Lieutenant Joshua Booth

    While many see Memorial Day as the kick-off to summer fun, that’s not what the holiday is all about. It was established to remember military men who died in the service of their country. It got its start after the War Between the States to honor the war dead. The wars of the 20th century added more to those ranks.
    This year, a young man named Andrew Pollard and a friend of his rode down from Massachusetts to honor 1st Lieutenant Joshua Booth, a Marine platoon leader who was killed by a sniper in Hadithah, Iraq on Oct. 17, 2006.