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Today's News

  • Bill for preserving D-Day Memorial gains momentum

    Last week Fifth District Congressman Tom Perriello testified to the National Parks, Forests and Public Lands Subcommittee of the House Committee on Natural Resources in support of his legislation, H.R. 2689, which would begin the process for bringing the National D-Day Memorial under the purview of the National Park Service.

        Additionally, Dr. William McIntosh, president and CEO of the National D-Day Memorial Foundation, testified.

  • There’s your sign

    Someone in Cris Tyler’s neighborhood finally decided to take matters into his own hands last week. After several months of not having a street sign, a homemade sign marking the intersection of Laurel and Peaks streets went up.

        “It’s a problem and it seems like a simple fix,” Tyler said while sitting at his porch last week at the corner of the intersection.

        And a permanent sign might soon be on its way.

  • Hospice House plans move ahead; challenge grant met

    Action by the county’s planning commission, Monday night, kept the Hospice House construction process on track.

  • Area residents given chance to relive the days of WWII

    The people and places of World War II will come to life next week in downtown Bedford.

        The Bedford Museum and Genealogical Library will present its annual Memorial Walk Thursday, Oct. 15 on the streets of downtown Bedford with the theme “A Walk Through World War II Memory Lane.”

  • BMH receives major certification

        Bedford Memorial Hospital marked a major achievement Thursday, celebrating its accreditation as a chest pain center by the Society of Chest Pain Centers.

        Bedford’s hospital is the first rural hospital in Central Virginia and one of only four rural hospitals in the Commonwealth to receive this accreditation. There are a total 14 accredited chest pain centers in Virginia. There are 505 worldwide.

  • Electronics recycling

    Remember the days of the Commodore 64, the Apple II, and the Atari 400. Remember when folks couldn’t figure out what anyone would need with 640K of memory.

        Those are days, long gone by. But in the basements, attics and garages of many area residents those memories appear to linger, along with broken down microwave ovens, old television sets and printers that no longer print.

        But what can be done with all of that electronic garbage? The city of Bedford did its part last week to help us get rid of the waste.

  • Letters

    Grieving the loss

        The community grieves at the loss of Olde Liberty Station.  It has been a welcoming place to enjoy good food for so many.

        Happily Harry and Julie Leist are planning to reconstruct and reopen this well-loved restaurant and landmark.

  • Perriello pushes for key changes in health care reform proposals

    As Congress continues to work on healthcare reform, I am focused on making sure the voices of Central and Southern Virginians are represented in the debate. I know Virginians are deeply concerned about getting health care costs under control, securing the insurance people already have, and taking care of our seniors.  Getting my constituents’ feedback has been of primary importance to me, which is why I launched an online healthcare forum (www.perriello.house.gov/healthcareforum) in June and held over 100 hours of town hall meetings in August.

  • We must listen to the American people on health care reform

    This summer Democratic leaders in Congress introduced H.R. 3200, the “America’s Affordable Health Choices Act”, which sets the tone for a Washington takeover of the health care system —one defined by federal regulation, mandates, a myriad of new big government programs, and a significant increase in federal spending and debt. 

  • Economy can't afford current, expensive health care system

    Over the past several months, my staff and I have met with health care providers, community leaders, and concerned citizens from across Virginia about the need to reform our nation’s health care system. In addition, my office has received and responded to more than 40,000 e-mails, letters and phone calls from Virginians concerning the health care debate.