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Today's News

  • Business flourishes in spite of economy

    In spite of the bad economy, some businesses are flourishing. Legacy Tile and Flooring is one of those. The business has even expanded.

        Michael Williams and his wife, Karen, own the place, located in Forest Square. They opened the store, which sells tile, carpet, stone and hardwood flooring, two-and-a-half years ago.

        “We opened up with a customer driven approach, rather than product driven,” Michael Williams said.

  • Neighbors question impact of proposed water, sewer system

    A proposal to build a private water and sewer system in Goodview brought a crowd of opponents to the Bedford County Planning Commission’s first meeting of the new year. Opposition wasn’t limited to just the special use permit under consideration but extended to the density of the residential developments it is intended to serve.

  • Southern Flavoring celebrates 80 years

    In spite of a tight economy, one of Bedford’s oldest businesses is prospering.

        Southern Flavoring got its start in 1929 after a mine cave-in left William G. Claytor a paraplegic. Claytor had worked as a mine inspector.

  • Attempted capital murder charge

    While investigating a burglary at a barn on Homestead Road in Bedford County, Bedford County Sheriff’s investigator Sgt. Brian Neal testified at a preliminary hearing Monday in General District Court that he was approached by Jay Woodrow Creasy, who lived adjacent to the property, who notched an arrow in a bow and pointed it in his direction.

        “I don’t allow pigs on my farm,” Neal said he was told by Creasy, who then added, “now you’re going to die.”

  • Attorney: Woman ‘remorseful’ for faking diagnosis

    The Moneta woman accused of faking having terminal breast cancer, and receiving money from  fundraisers to help her, is remorseful for her actions, according to her lawyer, Assistant Public Defender Michael Lonchar.

        Ashley Barton Weeks, 27, waived her right Monday in Bedford County General District Court to a preliminary hearing on a felony charge of obtaining money by false pretense. The case will now go before a grand jury, likely to be heard in February.

  • A West Point trio

    Getting appointed to a service academy is the equivalent of a $250,000 scholarship, according to Susan Ranowsky of New London.

        For the Ranowsky family, it’s happened three times. Their daughter, Sarah, a senior at Jefferson Forest High School learned that she had been appointed to the West Point class of 2014. She will join her two brothers, Geoffrey “Geoff” and Josh who are already in their second year there.

  • D-Day Foundation moves

    The building at the corner of East Main Street and South Street that has housed the offices of the National D-Day Foundation for 13 years is now empty.

        The Foundation’s office is now at 106 East Main Street, the former site of the ABC store. The D-Day Foundation set up its resource center at that site six-and-a-half years ago, not long after the ABC store moved out.

  • Resolutions that are needed in 2010

        Poet Sam Walter Foss once wrote: “On the thirty-second day of the thirteenth month / on the eighth day of the week we will find the things we seek.” As 2010 leaps into high gear, let’s hope his thoughts are more sarcasm than truth. There is much to be done in this first year of the next decade. Such as...

  • Cutting through red tape

    One of the most important parts of my job is to assist constituents with any issues or problems they are facing when dealing with federal government agencies. The caseworkers in my offices in Charlottesville, Danville, Farmville, and Martinsville helped nearly 800 5th District residents in 2009 cut through government red tape and solve individual, sometime complex, problems with federal agencies. Here are the kinds of cases we helped with and some of the stories behind the numbers.

  • Government, Inc. leads to red ink for our nation’s small businesses

    Four years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its decision in the now-notorious case of Kelo v. City of New London, which authorized the government to take private property from individuals for nearly any reason under the guise of eminent domain, even to give to other private individuals or entities.  The public outcry over this decision was so great that it forced states to enact laws to significantly rein in their own eminent domain powers.