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Today's News

  • County students will no longer attend alternative school

    Three Bedford County students scheduled to attend the R.E. Cook Regional Alternative School this year will be transferred to the Bridge School in Bedford, because of a planned relocation of that school.

  • Learning English by immersion

    Sou Yasuda, 13, of Toyama, Japan is having a great adventure this summer.

        Part of the adventure is that he’s spending four weeks in Bedford County living with an American family in the Thaxton area. The other part of the adventure is that Yasuda does not speak English and the DeWald family, the Americans hosting him, do not speak Japanese.

        Actually, Yasuda does know a little English, he’s been taking it in Japan. This summer he’s been learning by the immersion method, or in this case, the swim or sink method.

  • Serving up lunch

        Not long after the Gingerbread Cafe closed, a new lunch spot opened on North Bridge Street at that location.

        According to Teri Okuley, that was deliberate. Okuley owns Ivy Bridge Cafe. She wanted to get the doors open before Gingerbread Cafe’s customer base drifted away. Renovation work started in March, a month after Gingerbread closed and the new restaurant opened its doors for the first time on June 2

  • Superintendent continues work on transition

        Several Bedford County schools will have new principals this year as a result of a reorganization plan being implemented by new Bedford County Schools Superintendent Dr. Douglas Schuch.

        Dr. Schuch announced the changes, that include a number of transfers and reassignments, following last Thursday’s special called meeting of the Bedford County School Board.

        Among the changes:

  • Edible history

    Local children harvested produce and an education this year from the National D-Day Memorial victory garden.

        During World War II, Americans were encouraged to plant victory gardens at home. The goal of these gardens was to increase the food supply during the war.

  • When it comes to turning over the keys of our healthcare system to the government, this nation, with the Cash for Clunkers program as an example, should remember buyer beware

    The Cash for Clunkers program has highlighted several key points for all of us to remember. Consider this:

        • The public has taken full advantage of the opportunity to receive $4,500 for their old gas-guzzling vehicles from the government. This shouldn’t be a surprise. Most folks like “free” money and this taxpayer-supported program has provided a great opportunity to take advantage of that. In fact it has been so well utilized that the program has cashed out in its first week. That leads to the next point...

  • Letters

    On healthcare

        To date, much has been said in the media by the representatives of both sides of the fence regarding proposed healthcare legislation. Hopefully serious debate will continue until citizens have a plan that serves better than the system currently in use.  The exception being, of course, the one Congress enjoys at tax payer expense.

  • Latest drafts of health care bill include some significant improvements

    As I return home from Congress for an extended work period in the district, I will be devoting most of my time to discussing health care reform with constituents and doctors. For weeks, I made clear to Congressional leaders that we should not rush a vote on health care. I have already met with over 150 doctors and medical professional in our district about health care, and each meeting produces better ideas for improving health care and reducing costs.

  • We need commonsense health care reforms

    While we can all agree that our current health care system is flawed there are many different ideas about how to fix it.  Recently Democratic Leaders in Congress introduced the “America’s Affordable Health Choices Act”, which sets the tone for a Washington takeover of the health care system.  While this misguided legislation simply offers more of what is wrong with the current system, House Republicans have offered commonsense reforms that will make health care more affordable, reduce the number of uninsured and increase quality.

  • Building financial success and control

    As an educational outreach program of Virginia’s two land grant universities, Virginia Tech and Virginia State University, the mission of Virginia Cooperative Extension is to assess the needs of our local communities and then develop educational programs to meet those needs. 

        One way to do this is by providing research-based information so that citizens can make well-informed decisions. As we continue our discussion on building financial success, let’s review what we discussed in the previous articles.