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Today's News

  • Centertown Bedford hosts Christmas events

        Bedford Main Street kicks off Bedford’s Christmas celebration with its annual tree lighting at Centertown Park, Friday at 6 p.m.

        Dan Plattus, Main Street’s office manager, said area residents are encouraged to bring an ornament for the tree, then stick around for music, carriage rides and hot chocolate, apple cider and cookies. The treats will be at Centertown Park and the Bower Center. Clam Diggers and Stillwaters, both located on South Bridge Street, have live music planned.

  • Shepherd’s Table serves up Thanksgiving meal

    Once again, the Shepherd’s Table served up a Thanksgiving dinner with turkey, dressing, sweet potatoes, green beans and pumpkin pie. The organization regularly serves on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, so this dinner is actually served the day before Turkey Day.

        The Shepherd’s table provides free hot lunches to people in Bedford who are in tight financial circumstances. The Shepherd’s Table began serving in May, 1991. Serving Thanksgiving meals in 1989 and 1990 indicated that there was a need in the community.

  • Climate change scientists cook the books

    Last week’s revelation that leading scientists with the global warming movement have been cooking the books to support their “scientific consensus” that planet earth is heading towards an apocalyptic end if changes aren’t made should make this nation take pause — including Fifth District Congressman Tom Perriello.

  • Letters

    Prejudice and paranoia

        It is not an easy thing I ask.  First of all, hear me out.

        The Confederate battle flag [rebel flag] was used in the 19th century as the banner of a people who fought primarily for their freedom from the oppression[financial, social, and otherwise] of a northern neighbor.  Many Virginians were a part of this cause.  This cause was lost. Every April 15 we are reminded of this.

  • Health care reform will pass

        It was indeed a historic moment when the health care reform bill passed the House of Representatives, simply because corporate opposition and right-wing hysteria have always kept it from getting that far.

        It was President Harry Truman who first tried to institute universal health care. His plans were defeated by the American Medical Association, which trotted out some alleged quote from Lenin about the glories of “socialized medicine.”

  • Liberal intolerance

        The situation the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington D. C. may face shows the extent that liberal politicians will go to shove the homosexual agenda down our throats.

        Members of the Washington D. C. City Council are considering an ordinance that would legalize same-sex marriage in our nation’s capital. The ordinance goes beyond putting a government stamp of approval on these sort of couplings and this creates a problem for the Archdiocese of Washington.

  • Mud, sweat and tears

    Staunton River’s unlikely run at playoff glory came to a screeching halt last Friday evening, as Spotswood ground out a 36-18 win over the upstart Eagles.

  • Minutemen to host Lee Friday

    Perhaps Liberty should change its nickname to “The Bankers.”

    After all, the Minutemen have been keeping hours that would make J.P. Morgan blush.

  • Big game at Liberty moved to Saturday night

     Liberty Athletic Director Lori Mattson announced that the Region III semifinal between R.E. Lee and Liberty will be played on Saturday night, rather than on Friday.

    A field soaked by days of heavy rain proved unplayable.  With the weather clearing, it should be dry enough on Saturday.

    Game time is 7:30 p.m.

  • Owner of property hopes to preserve slave cabin

    According to the census of 1860, there were 10,176 slaves laboring in Bedford County. A tangible reminder of these men and women is on the verge of crumbling into oblivion.

        Ivy Cliff is a historic house in New London. It’s more than 200 years old and was once the home of a family that owned a tobacco plantation. Near the house, one of the plantation’s slave cabins is still standing and Chris Gulluscio, the current owner of Ivy Cliff, wants to save it.