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Today's News

  • Camps set tone for the future

    Summer became official last week.

    It wasn’t the summer solstice that kicked off the season.  Rather, it was the opening of several sports camps across the county.

  • Pictures help determine cause of fire

    Though a definite determination will probably never be possible, authorities from Bedford County Fire and Rescue believe that a fire that destroyed a Forest shopping center on June 20 was caused from a cigarette, or the match that was used to light it.

        From photographs submitted to the agency, Fire Marshal John Jennings determined that the fire began in some cardboard boxes at a deck behind the Blackwater Bike Shop. Those photographs were taken by Laura Layton who was inside the I.C. Studios tattoo shop at the strip mall when the fire began.

  • Fire at Earnest’s Lake home still under investigation

    The cause of the March fire at the $1.2 million Smith Mountain Lake home of Wesley Earnest is still under investigation, according to Bedford County Commonwealth’s Attorney Randy Krantz.

  • Council to fund Main Street

    Bedford Main Street, Inc. will receive funding from the city of Bedford for the next six months, but representatives from the organization must appear before city council in July to explain how they plan to reorganize.

  • SRHS offices get a gut-check

    As soon as the teachers checked out, the construction crews checked into the administration building at Staunton River High School.

        As part of the project that included construction of a new gymnasium and classrooms at the school, completed earlier this year, crews from JSK Partnership are now working on a $750,000 remodeling of the office space at SRHS. The entire building was gutted and is being redesigned.

  • Art camp

        The Bower Center hosted the first of two week-long art day camps last week.

        The goal of the program is to give children hands-on opportunities in art with classes taught by people who know their stuff. Arts offered were mosaics, pottery, painting, music lab, drama and drumming.

        “They are just so intense,” commented Sara Braaten of the youth participating. “They put their heart and soul into it.”

  • D-Day camp draws 26

        According to Dr. William McIntosh, director of the National D-Day Memorial Foundation, the D-Day Memorial’s purpose is education. Last week, the Memorial carried out one part of that mission with a D-Day day camp.

  • Unsung hero: Cheek remembered for service

    When Linda and Charlie Exley first arrived in the Bedford area 19 years ago, Elisha “John” Cheek and his wife, Patricia, befriended the Yankee refugees.

        The Exleys met the local couple because Patricia Cheek collected dolls and Linda Exley had a doll shop at the time.

        “They invited us for Christmas,” she said. “They became our Virginia parents.” For the Exleys and many others, John Cheek’s death earlier this year was a heartfelt loss.

  • Orchardist steps in to organize farmers market

    ith Bedford Main Street currently without a director, a local orchardist has stepped in to reorganize the Bedford Farmers Market.

        Along with being a son of a multi-generation Bedford County farm family, Ronnie Gross is also one of the farmer representatives on the county’s agribusiness board. Along with being part of the family orchard business, he has Mountain Valley Produce LLC, a wholesale company that distributes to restaurants and stores.

        “It gives restaurants a chance to buy local,” he said.

  • The House has decided to attack the energy problem by tilting at windmills

    Fifth District Congressman Tom Perriello is touting the fact that he voted for last week’s cap-and-trade energy bill, even though he knows it’s not widely supported in his district. Even worse, he voted for it though it has the potential, some say, to be the most costly tax increase in American history.