Today's News

  • Taking control of the budget

  • Donald Trump lost in ‘birther’ land

        The resistance to Barack Obama as President of the United States has produced a virus of hysteria among some people in this country. The “birthers” are the one manifestation of this that just won’t die out.

        Now, along comes a very prominent person, the billionaire real estate mogul, Donald Trump, who says he’s interested in running for president. You’d think, given his success in business and finance, that Trump might want to highlight the deficit and the debt, job creation, and similar issues.

  • Getting ready for the big one

        A last minute deal between “Democrats” and Republicans on April 8 avoided a government shutdown. As details emerged last week, it became apparent why nobody was happy with the result.

        The “Democrats” didn’t want any cuts at all. A lot of Republicans aren’t happy because a lot of cuts appear to be not real cuts at all. Furthermore funding for the EPA, and a few other things that many Republicans are not happy with, didn’t get cut as deeply as they would have liked.

  • The Good News

    hen the soldiers of the governor took Jesus into the common hall, and gathered unto him the whole band of soldiers.  And they stripped him, and put on him a scarlet robe.

        And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand: and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, King of the Jews!

  • Some lucky student may win this car

        Vickey Duncan and Melissa Merritt, leaders with the Liberty High School PTSA, were at the school Friday showing off a car that one student might just drive home later this year.

        The catch? Only students who attend this year’s After-Prom party at the school will have a chance to qualify to win.

  • What’s next for the School Board?

        Facing a $1.1 million cut from its approved budget, School Board Chairman Debbie Hoback said, in a phone interview Tuesday, that the board will use the same procedure it has used in the past when it did not get as much funding as anticipated.

        This involves looking at items that the board has already considered and deciding what it can do to get the numbers down. The board will have to cut its budget to match the funding from the county.
        “I think we will be able to get it done,” she said.

  • Life in the workplace

        A new initiative to get high school students experience in the workplace has turned out to be a success.

        Patricia Knox, the county’s school nurse coordinator, said that the school division has already been making efforts to give students with learning disabilities workplace experience. Some of these students have a strong desire to do something that will help others and this gave Knox an idea.  What  if these kids could get work experience in a medical environment?

  • Goodlatte stops at Poplar Forest Nursery

    Sixth District Congressman Bob Goodlatte stopped by Poplar Forest Nursery Monday on a tour of agricultural operations in his district.

        Poplar Forest Nursery, located in Forest, sits on land that was originally part of Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest plantation. Doug Arthur has owned and  operated the nursery for 21 years and grows 90 percent of all the plants he sells.
        “We just got through redoing the place,” he said.

  • ‘War’s been declared:’ What led up to Monday’s decision

        It became apparent last week there wouldn’t be an extra $1.1 million for Bedford County schools next year. And the possibility was given that if the School Board decides to close any schools, there might be even less.

        Those were some of the decisions the Bedford County Board of Supervisors made during a budget work session Thursday, prior to Monday night’s vote to approve the county budget.

  • Sups cut school budget

        The ball is now in the School Board’s court

        On Monday, the Bedford County Board of Supervisors voted to adopt a budget that leaves the tax rate of 50 cents per $100 of assessed valuation unchanged.
        In the wake of the recent reassessment, this will mean a tax cut for most people. It will bring in about $2 million less than it did last year. The supervisors also eliminated the merchants’ capital tax, which brings in approximately $218,000.