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Today's News

  • County budget

    Bedford County’s Board of Supervisors held a public hearing on the county budget Monday night before a nearly empty auditorium. Four citizens, other than county staff, turned out and two spoke. Both aimed their comments at the Sheriff’s Office.

        Billy Hackworth, a frequent critic of Sheriff Mike Brown, said that the sheriff’s budget should be cut by $1 million this year, followed by an additional $1 million cut next year.

        “He wastes money,” said Hackworth.

  • 90-year-old veteran recalls service in WWII

    Back in October, 1942, a young man from Brooklyn named Angelo Basile, received a written invitation from the U. S. Army to personally participate in World War II.

        Basile ended up in the 80th Infantry Division, nicknamed “Blue Ridge Division.” Its division patch, which Basile wore on his dress uniform, featured three bluish mountains. Today, he lives among those mountains. He and his wife, Mary, reside with their son, Philip, on the Bedford County side of Smith Mountain Lake.

  • Pilot program on short list for stimulus funding

    At least one of the two dozen projects submitted by the city of Bedford for funding through the $800 billion federal stimulus package is on the short list for approval.

        Bedford has made the semi-final list of projects seeking $77 million of funding through the clean water revolving fund. Bedford’s proposed project is a water reuse project, one of seven such projects being considered for that funding. Bedford’s request, at $165,000, is small compared to others. The Hampton Roads Sanitation District has a $10.2 million water reuse project proposal.

  • There can be a high cost when businesses get assistance from the government

    The cost of doing business with the government became clear last month and everyone should take a long hard look at those consequences: Bailout-mania comes with a heavy price tag. Just ask Rick Wagoner.

  • Letters

    Bedford Ride needs high-speed Internet

        County Supervisors and other groups are working to have high speed Internet available to all or most county residents who are interested.

  • Budget makes some progress towards getting the deficit under control
  • A fiscally irresponsible budget

    Just days ago the House Democrats pushed through their budget resolution for fiscal year 2010,  a $3.6 trillion budget resolution which spends too much, taxes too much and borrows too much.  This fiscally irresponsible budget, which I voted against, will significantly increase the tax burden on American families and small businesses to pay for new wasteful government spending while heaping trillions of dollars of debt on future generations.  Facing a slowing economy and an increased cost of living, Americans have to tighten their belts and carefully budget their hard-earned m

  • Cemetery entitlements

        Burial in a national cemetery is open to all members of the armed forces and veterans discharged under conditions other than dishonorable, as well as their spouse, un-remarried widow or widower, minor children and (under certain conditions) unmarried adult children.

        Also eligible for burial are members of the reserve components of the armed forces, the Army and Air National Guard and the Reserve Officer Training Corps who died while on active duty for training or performing their services.

  • George Wellington Meador

        The Bedford Museum and Genealogical Library recognizes April as Confederate History Month by presenting stories of Confederate cemeteries that are being restored in honor of the brave people that served.

        The Museum cooperating with the Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp 1475 and the United Daughters of Confederacy, Gen. William R. Terry Chapter 580 are identifying any Confederate graves that need restoration, researching the persons buried, obtaining proper tombstones and restoring the graves to presentable condition.

  • American jailed in Peru should be freed

        In a jail cell in Lima, Peru, a 39-year-old American woman waits to give birth to her child. She’s eight months pregnant, but is not in particularly good health, and must have back surgery at some point after the birth.

        For American Lori Berenson, most of those facts represent progress. The baby, of course, is good news. So is the modern, well-equipped facility in Lima, unlike the other remote and rustic prisons where she has lived since 1995.