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Today's News

  • Goode’s Country Kitchen closes after 30 years

    Goode’s Country Kitchen closed its doors for the last time Sunday.

        The restaurant has stood on U. S. 460, on the eastbound lane just east of Bedford, since 1981 when Betty and Norris Goode acquired the shell of a building and turned it into Bedford County’s first country buffet. It finally closed, a victim of steeply rising food prices and the passage of time.

  • Student takes gun to school

    A Bedford Elementary School student was taken into custody Monday morning after a teacher discovered the student had a .45 caliber handgun in his backpack.

        The Bedford Police Department received the call about 10:15 a.m. When police arrived, the school administration had already confiscated the gun, according to Bedford Police Chief Jim Day.

  • Bedford man finalist in Duke’s Mayo jingle contest

    The world of professional music can be just as competitive as any sporting event.

        Just ask Michael Inge.

        The former Bedford resident makes a living creating music in Nashville, Tenn., and is now one of two finalists in the Duke’s Mayonnaise jingle contest.  And the fact is, his hometown can help him win that contest.

  • Balancing the budget

    In a survey taken last week, employees of Bedford County Schools favored taking a 1 percent pay cut over layoffs.

        That option was favored by 51.6 percent of the close to 900 employees who responded to the survey. Less than 24 percent favored a 3 percent cut in order to save some positions.

  • State cuts hit more than schools

    Although the cut in state funds for schools is the largest single hit that the Bedford area will take, other areas will also see reductions.

        According to County Administrator Kathleen Guzi, Bedford County will get $300,000 less for constitutional officers and libraries. Constitutional officers include the sheriff, the clerk of the circuit court, the county treasurer and the commissioner of the revenue. Of these, the sheriff’s office will take the biggest reduction, a cut of $130,000 in state money.

  • Making a difference

    Having run through $700 billion in a bailout bill with nothing to show for it, Congress and the President are now salivating over how to spend another $1 trillion that, at best, will do little to stimulate the economy or create jobs. At the same time, however, the people of this nation continue to be the one’s stepping out and making a difference.

        Take the  Society of St. Andrew, for instance.

        The Big Island faith-based hunger relief organization stepped up big last year.

  • Letters

    Be careful when driving

        Once again, our family has gone through a situation that we had hoped would never happen. As all parents know, when your children start driving, you hope they will draw the line between common sense and being reckless.

        Unfortunately, we cannot be with them at all times and remind them of the consequences of a foolish mistake.

  • H. R. 1 is a solid step towards economic recovery

    With the economy in crisis and 16,500 Americans losing their jobs each day, Congress acted rapidly, transparently, and responsibly to pass an economic recovery package for American families. The bill is not perfect and may yet be improved, but it is a reasonable and decisive step out of economic chaos. I voted for H.R. 1, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, because our families and localities need this lifeline.

     

  • There's a better way forward

    This past week the House of Representatives considered the so called “American Recovery and Reinvestment Act”.  This legislation, which will cost the American taxpayers more than $1.1 trillion including interest, is just another example of wasteful Washington spending at its worst disguised as an economic stimulus bill.  The goal of this legislation was to provide tax relief to families and invest in infrastructure.  Unfortunately, the legislation has been loaded up with pork barrel spending like $600 million to buy new cars for government workers, $44 million for

  • Black History Month

    The Bedford Museum and Genealogical Library has honored those that have made history in the past. This year the Museum is honoring those that are making history today.

        Bedford is proud of  Charles Nelms, Sergeant of the Bedford Police Dept. Nelms was born in Body Camp and attended Body Camp Elementary School. After graduating from Staunton River High School he served three years in the Marines achieving the rank of Corporal. Charles is serving his 23rdrd year in the Bedford Police Dept.