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Today's News

  • Staunton River boys' basketball preview

    The fans of Staunton River will get their first look at the 2008-09 Golden Eagles this Friday night.  That’s when Staunton River hosts Bassett for the team’s first game in its new gym.

  • Emotional bookends--commentary

      I saw Jefferson Forest football players shed tears twice this season.

  • A bright future cut short

    People who knew Mitchell Simmons say that he would have had a bright future.

        Simmons, a 17-year-old senior at Staunton River High School, died Monday, Dec. 1, after an accidental shooting. He was remembered this week for his service to others, his friendship and his hard work both on the baseball field and in the classroom.

        “He wanted to go to VMI and would have been a shoe-in to get there,” said Joe Hubble, his advanced placement government teacher. “They would have loved to have him.”

  • Children's Holiday Memories

    Bedford area residents welcomed in the holiday season Saturday as the streets were lined with those attending the Bedford Christmas Parade.

        “It’s nice to see the community come out,” noted Bedford Main Street Executive Director Linda Exley. “The comments were very positive.”

  • Death of child ruled a homicide

    A special grand jury will be impaneled next month to investigate the death of an eight-month old child in September.

        Bedford Police Department Chief Jim Day said Friday that the death of the child, Marissa Burnette, had officially been ruled this week as a homicide.

        On Sept. 2, officers responded to 1114 Maiden Lane in the city of Bedford regarding a possible injury to the child.  The child was transported to Bedford Memorial Hospital and then to Roanoke Memorial Hospital. The infant was pronounced deceased on Sept. 4. 

  • Layoff affects 90

    Frank Chervan, Inc. announced last week the closure of several operating units located at its Bedford plant.

        The company notified about 90 affected workers Tuesday that operations will be closed in early February.  The company will still operate a rough lumber mill in Bedford that will likely employ around 30 people.

  • Zoning meeting draws public interest

    t look, Monday night, at proposed changes to the county’s zoning ordinance.

        Bedford County’s community development department held an informational meeting in the County Administration building’s ground floor training room. The walls were covered with maps of each district showing the current zoning and the proposed new zoning. The maps for the proposed new zoning were covered with clear plastic sheets that allowed people to write suggestions on them. The proposed maps were the first draft of the zoning maps.

  • Substation request greeted with skepticism

    Bedford County’s supervisors expressed skepticism Monday over the location of a proposed Southside Electric substation.

        The power company wants to build a new power substation on a 5.7 acre lot on Dickerson Mill Road. The county’s planning commission voted 7-0 to recommend approval.

  • Greens hung at historic meeting house

        The Bedford Historical Society held its annual Hanging of the Greens lunch at the Bedford Historic Meeting House.

        Hanging of the Greens is an old English tradition observed in many churches. It marks the beginning of Advent, the period leading up to Christmas. It got its name because of the green wreaths that were hung as decorations for the season. It marks the point when many churches put up their holiday decorations, leaving them up through Epiphany, which comes on Jan. 6 and marks the visit of the Magi to the Christ Child.

  • Preserving their stories

    A lake area author has written a book on combat veterans and he came to the National D-Day Memorial last week to sign copies.

        Bob Vanderlinde knows something about serving in combat. A member of the 187th Airborne, he made two combat jumps during the Korean War. He was wounded three times and still has pieces of shrapnel in his body.

        His first jump was on Oct. 20, 1950.

        “We jumped 50 miles north of Pyongyang,” he said.