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Today's News

  • Taking a stand against bullying

    Bedford Town Councilman Robert Carson is concerned about bullying and has started a campaign to draw attention to the problem and get people talking about it. He’s begun by distributing buttons that read “I take a stand against bullying!”

        “Most of the buttons of my first order have gone,” he said. Some have gone as far as Tennessee.
        Bullying can take multiple forms. It can be physical, but it can also be verbal. Carson notes that it’s possible to destroy another person with your words.

  • County may raise taxes

        The budget Bedford County’s supervisors are developing may include a real estate tax increase.
        During a Monday night work session, Deputy County Administrator Frank Rogers described two measures that will close the $141,000 gap remaining in the county’s budget. One comes from savings on medical insurance.

  • Eyes of Freedom

        A truck, called the Eyes of Freedom Truck, made a stop at the National D-Day Memorial, Friday. This truck commemorates a unit’s loss in the Iraq War — a Marine Reserve company that lost 26 men in 2005 in fighting in Al Anbar province — the type of loss in which Bedford can surely empathize.

  • School system seeks $3.87M more from supervisors

        After narrowly passing a $108 million budget on a 4-3 vote last Thursday, the Bedford County School Board had a chance Monday to try and sell that budget to the county supervisors during a work session attended by both boards.
        The school budget presented to the supervisors included a request for an additional $3.87 million in funding from the county, for a total local expenditure of $42.9 million.

  • New Rec Association feels growing pains

        For all of the benefits expected to arrive with the reversion of Bedford into a town, some negative aspects have come to fruition, as well.
        As part of the reversion agreement, what was formerly the City Parks and Recreation Department was to have fallen under the auspices of the Bedford County Parks and Recreation Department.

  • Sports commentary: Warnings and cautions

     

    Lately, I've learned not to let the tank run low on a certain car.  You'll not hear the end of it.

    For the past couple of weeks, I've been driving a rental car.  It's a late-model Nissan Altima.

    It's not a bad car, as far as rentals go.  It certainly will never, ever let me run out of gas.  That's because it has at least four different ways of letting me know when it is low on petrol, including the traditional gas gauge as well as audio and visual alerts.

  • Staunton River girls soccer preview

     

    There's youth.  Then there's the Staunton River girls soccer team.

    The roster is loaded with underclassmen, including a good number of freshmen.

    The team carries but three seniors on its 18-player roster. Still, when you realize that one of those seniors holds a pair of VHSL scoring records, you tend to feel a wee bit less sympathetic to the plight of the Lady Eagles.

    Taylor Tester returns for her senior season, hoping to take up where she left off.

  • Liberty girls soccer preview

     

    On the one hand, the Liberty girls soccer team is a young one:  Of the 17 players on the team, only four are seniors.

    But, when one of those four happens to be the reigning Seminole District Player of the Year, one tends to feel not terribly sorry for the Lady Minutemen.

  • Jefferson Forest girls soccer preview

     

    "We're talking about rings," said Jefferson Forest girls soccer head coach Stan Golon, when asked about team objectives for this season.

    The rings to which the coach referred are not class rings.  Nor are they friendship rings, mood rings, toe rings or pinkie rings.

    We're talking State rings, Bay-bee!

    While Golon is in no position to promise a State title, he is in position to put enough talent on the pitch to make a solid case.

  • Staunton River Boys soccer preview

     

    The good news for Staunton River's boys soccer team is that it has ample opportunity to improve.

    The bad news is that it will have to do so in the rugged Blue Ridge District/Conference 31.

    The Eagles won only two contests last season, with none of those victories taking place in district play.

    This year, the team takes to the pitch with a new head coach and a positive attitude, as well as a desire to engage in a high level of physical play.

    But, how will that translate in terms of play?