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Today's News

  • Marching through Georgia

    I didn't watch any of the Beijing Olympics. In the first place, the Olympics bore me. Furthermore, another event had my attention ? the Caucasus Hot Lead Olympics. Georgia was the host country and major competitions included bombing, artillery shelling and assault rifle shooting. Russia seems to have scooped up all the gold medals.

  • When it comes to education parents must be involved

    Teachers and administrators are spending this week getting ready for the start of school. On Monday, they'll greet the 2008-2009 Bedford County Schools students back to class.

    There will be changes, new faces and even new classrooms for some. But the goals ? whether it's through the public school system or a homeschool or private school option ? remain the same. A good education is paramount to helping provide for the success of the next generation.

  • Letters

    For years farmers have reported that crops grown in biosolids amended soil appear to be more drought resistant than crops that don’t receive biosolids. Now researchers at Virginia Tech think they know why.

    Biosolids are the nutrient-rich organic materials resulting from the EPA-approved treatment of sewage sludge in municipal wastewater treatment plants. Biosolids are applied as fertilizer and soil conditioner to farmland and forests in Virginia and throughout the U.S.

  • Back to school

    As August comes to a close, students of all ages are stocking up on notebooks, rulers, textbooks, pens and pencils: the telltale signs that another school year is beginning. As teachers and students head back to school we are reminded of the importance of education. President John F.

  • Man drowns at SML

    A Moneta man drowned early Monday morning after the fishing boat he was on took on water.

    Barry K. Phillipe, 37, drowned trying to swim to shore in the Gills Creek section of Smith Mountain Lake about 2 a.m. Aug. 18, according to Lt. Tony Fisher of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.

  • Having a blast at cop camp

    Pigs don't fly, but pigs' feet do, with the assistance of a blasting cap.

    A new feature of this year's Cop Camp were some demonstrations by the Virginia State Police's bomb unit. Garland Snead, who formerly worked as a trooper assigned to Bedford County but now with the bomb unit, ran their robot through its paces, and also blew some stuff up.

  • Program provides area youth a Safe Haven

    Safe Haven has a message for Bedford area residents: The program works, it’s open to all area youth and it’s worthy of the community’s support.

    “Over the years we have really made an impact on the children’s lives,” stated Camille Steepleton, youth services coordinator with the Historic Chapter of the American Red Cross.

  • Students head back to school

    Students in Bedford County head back to school Monday ? some will be heading to the traditional classroom, some for a second year of Early College and some will be joining the school system online.

    Fewer students than last year are expected to report ? but that number is yet to be determined. Last year enrollment predictions fell below expectations and that cost the county school budget state funding. With that in mind, officials expect enrollment to fall between 10,500 and 11,000, most likely around 10,800.

  • Horses add to the experience at Camp Virginia Jaycee

    Some extra horses, mainly provided by Many Blessings Farm, vastly expanded campers’ opportunities for horseplay at Camp Virginia Jaycee last week.

    According to Dana Zyrowski, Camp Jaycee’s director, the camp has three horses of its own. Many Blessings brought eight and Marcia Wingert brought one, along with a two-wheeled cart and a friendly Dalmatian. Zyrowski said that the extra horses meant that they were able to provide more horseback riding to more campers in that one week than they could during the entire summer.

  • AYP provides moving target

    The fact that two elementary schools failed to meet Adequate Yearly Progress standards (AYP) under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) became a subject for discussion at last week's county school board meeting. District 2 School Board Member Talbot Huff asked that it be added to the agenda as an information item.

    Dr. Bobbie Johnson, assistant superintendent of schools, had some good news and some bad news for the school board.

    "We did not make AYP as a school division," she said, relating the bad news.