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Today's News

  • Bush pleads guilty to involuntary manslaughter

    A Bedford County woman will spend the next six years in prison for attempting to elude Campbell County Sheriff's deputies last year.

    Heather Lynn Bush, 27, pleaded guilty to a felony level attempt to elude police and involuntary manslaughter when she appeared before Judge James Updike in Bedford County Circuit Court Friday.

  • Bedford Police Officer returns from duty in Iraq

    Tim Brooke normally wears the uniform of the Bedford City Police Department. Last year, however, he temporarily traded it for the pixilated camouflage of the United States Army.

    A captain in the Virginia National Guard, Brooke returned recently from duty in Iraq. Brooke served as a civil affairs officer with Headquarters Company, 116th Infantry Combat Brigade. His post was actually a Major's job, but he was assigned to it as he had been selected for promotion to that rank prior to the company's deployment.

  • County files response to Oakwood Villas lawsuit

    Bedford County Attorney Carl Boggess filed the county's response, in Bedford County Circuit Court, to a lawsuit over the rezoning that cleared the way for the Oakwood Villas condominium project.

  • Seven face drug-related charges

    Seven individuals are facing 29 charges as a result of indictments handed down before a Bedford County Special Grand Jury last month.

    On March 14, Bedford County Sheriff?s Narcotic Investigators testified before the Grand Jury resulting in the 29 indictments for distribution of narcotics and related offenses.

    "These indictments are the result of the on going commitment, hard work and dedication of the Narcotic Investigations Unit of the Bedford County Sheriff?s Office," stated Major Ricky Gardner of the Bedford County Sheriff's Office in a news release.

  • We can stop school shootings

    We have the knowledge and the ability to stop school violence like the shootings that just occurred at Northern Illinois University (NIU). Practical proven strategies for ending violence are available, and we are not using them. Why? Perhaps because we are culturally unaware of them.

  • Letters

    Flames spread to Bedford

    For the past several years in our country, some politicians, news commentators and talk show hosts have fanned the flames of fear and suspicion over the question of illegal immigration.

    Now it appears those flames have jumped the fire line and are burning in Bedford. And the fire has jumped out of the forest of illegal immigration and has burned the private property of one company?s attempt to provide simple, decent housing to workers in a legal migrant worker program.

  • Next year, we’ll start leaving Iraq

    It was certainly no coincidence that on the day last week when the fifth anniversary of the war in Iraq was reached, a new poll showed yet another decline in the approval rating of the president who launched this war.

    George W. Bush, whose long-awaited exit from office gets closer and closer with the sweet passing of each day, is now at a pathetic 31 percent approval rating. There can be little doubt that the main reason for this is his stubborn insistence upon continuing a war and an occupation that the American public largely turned against in 2005.

  • House leadership plays politics with America's security

    The national security of the United States is not something that should be a matter of political gamesmanship. However, one must question whether such is going on in the House of Representatives.

  • Say 'thanks' before they're gone

    France buried its last World War I veteran last week.

    Actually, Lazare Ponticelli was Italian. Born at the end of 1897, he left Italy, when he was 9, to join his brothers who were already in France. When Germany invaded in August, 1914, Ponticelli, still 16 at the time, lied about his age in order to enlist in the Foreign Legion. He wanted to fight for the country that took him in.

  • Working to decrease America’s dependence on foreign energy

    Each week, folks across the Sixth District and the nation are confronted with the rising cost of energy, from the gas pump to their electric and gas bills. Energy is vital to every sector of the U.S. economy, including homes, small businesses and industries. When energy supplies are tight, families and businesses are severely impacted by the resulting increase in energy costs.