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Today's News

  • Eagles show fight against Heritage, Christiansburg

    Staunton River’s volleyball team continued to show improvement with competitive showings against Heritage and Christiansburg on Aug. 29 and Aug. 31, respectively.

    The Eagles began its home stretch against Heritage on Tuesday evening. The young squad had previously faced the Pioneers in its home-opener, where they dropped the contest in three sets, 25-13, 25-21, 25-14.

  • Cavs split matches with Byrd and LB

    All good things must come to an end. That includes Jefferson Forest’s volleyball team’s win streak.

    The Cavaliers continued to roll with a win over Byrd to open up it’s week. After a hiccup in the first set, the Cavs rebounded by sweeping the next three sets 25-19, 25-23, 25-23.

    JF’s gritty performance was highlighted by Bailey Tibbs and Sarah Shanton’s nine kills each. Sydney Strain produced seven kills while Gracyn Draney and Kelsey Gerni had four kills a piece.

  • JF, Liberty face off in Seminole District play

    Liberty hosted Jefferson Forest, LCA and Brookville at Bedford CC for the fifth Seminole District match on Aug. 30.

    The Cavaliers looked to continue arguably the program’s best season with another District win. The Cavs have finished first at every match thus far except the High School Invitational in Midlothian, which featured elite talent from Class 5/6 high schools.

  • Staunton River, Liberty XC post first place finishers at Rush Farm

    Staunton River and Liberty had impressive showings at Rush Farm on Aug. 30. Both schools had one first-place finisher at the meet. Rustburg also competed and was the host school of the meet.
     

    Staunton River

    The Eagles found gold with Christiana Metric. The freshman logged a 21:26.68 in the 5000 m run to capture first place. Metric’s gold medal run was a whopping 24 seconds faster than the second place finisher.

  • Cavs stun Magna Vista

    Jefferson Forest’s football team successfully rebounded from its season-opener loss with an impressive come-from-behind win over Magna Vista on Sept. 1 at the Sabre Stadium.

    After the Cavs Aug. 25 loss, head coach Bob Christmas reiterated that he hadn’t lost faith in his team and believed they could win as long as they stayed focused and played hard.

    Despite a tough, front-loaded schedule, the Cavs win over Magna Vista makes for a promising year.

  • Staunton River obliterates Cave Spring, 62-21

    Chuck Poston, the Eagle’s head football coach, said his team’s goal was to be 1-0 at the end of every week.

    So far, so good.

    The rainy conditions couldn’t slow the Eagles offense down as they recorded their second win of the season by destroying Cave Spring on Sept. 1, 66-21.

  • Frog Went A Courtin’

        Bedford County naturalist, Mike Roberts, knew the frog he heard serenading from the pond on his father’s farm was not one of several indigenous species that sound off there during the hot summer nights each summer. Days later, and after researching a friend’s frog ap, (yes, there is such a thing), Roberts discovered the raucous sounding amphibian was a male, green tree frog, far removed from its normal geographical range.

  • Rationalizations don’t justify the Confederacy

        The reaction from so many Southern whites to the events of Aug. 12 and thereafter is sadly familiar to many of us who grew up in territories of the old Confederacy, but never bought into the racism.
        We were taught it, to be sure, but with sharp minds and good hearts, we grew to know – from our own experience – that to harbor ill feelings toward someone merely because of the color of their skin was, well, stupid.

  • Remembering Lacey

        August 26 turned out to be a sad day. I was checking out Facebook and I started seeing posts about Lacey Putney’s death. He had died that morning.
        I knew he was in seriously bad health. I would run into his brother, Macon, almost every week and ask “How is Lacey?” The news since early this year was never good, so I wasn’t surprised. Still, the news was distressing and it left me in a gloomy mood for several days.

  • A visit from Ivybridge

    Ray Wilson, the former mayor of Ivybridge, stopped by the National D-Day Memorial, Friday.

         Ivybridge is a small town in Southern England that was frequented by the Bedford Boys during the two years they spent training in England prior to D-Day. The town gets its name from an ivy-covered 13th century bridge in the town.
        Friday morning was cool and wet and it was suggested that D-Day Memorial staff — they denied it — had arranged the weather to make Wilson feel at home.