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Columns

  • Don’t be too quick

        The concept plan for Urban Development Areas  (UDA) in the Forest and New London areas of the county drew a vocal turnout to a public meeting two weeks ago. It was a larger crowd than the folks who organized the meeting expected, so the room they reserved at the Forest Library was too small for the number of people who showed up. Most seemed to have been already upset when they arrived and the crowding — Americans really don’t like being crowded — probably didn’t help their mood. Most opposed the UDA idea.

  • Religion often keeps people backward

         If, as many people believe, religion is man’s first attempt at explaining his world, then we may well need a second one, if we can keep our planet safe and healthy from climate change deniers, who sometimes use religion to justify their rejection of science.
        There are probably thousands of different religions in the world, but most religious people are Christians, Jews, or Muslims. Most of them live quietly within their beliefs.

  • Much can be done to improve health care in Virginia

    As the dust settles from the currently stalled efforts by Congress to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), concerns about the future of healthcare for Virginians remain at the forefront of the debate.

  • May small lights get bigger

    By James F. Burns
    Retired professor
    University of Florida.  

        The mystery of the motivation behind the machine-gun massacre in Las Vegas—59 dead and 527 wounded—may literally be a blank.  Yes, a fill-in-the-blank exam in which the blank is the answer.

  • Why can’t a Muslim speak at Liberty?

        Liberty University has worked hard to gain its reputation as an arm of the national Republican Party, given that founder Jerry Falwell Sr. began the myths of “Christian conservatism,” the notion that, somehow, Christian teachings are consistent with right-wing American politics.
        It’s not true, of course, but legions of rural Americans fall for it, because of the stuff they hear in their fundamentalist churches, particularly about abortion and homosexuality.

  • Council will miss Jim Vest

        It was a surprise to learn, at the beginning of the month, that Jim Vest is stepping down from Town Council. By the time this column sees print, Vest’s resignation will have taken effect. He officially submitted his resignation at Council’s Oct. 10 meeting.

  • NFL players stand up to Trump

        You’d think the President of the United States would have far greater concerns – North Korea, health care, our crumbling infrastructure – than what’s happening on the playing fields of professional football.
        But as we know, this idiot in the White House is unlike anyone before him, and we never know what will occupy his deranged mind. So, recently, he made one of his signature crazy speeches and went after NFL players who, to him, hadn’t sufficiently worshipped the American flag.

  • Trump was right

        Let me preface this column by reminding folks that I am not a Donald Trump fan. He wasn’t my first choice for the Republican Party nominee last year. He wasn’t my second or third choice either. I was appalled by the choice the two parties handed me and, during the debates between him and Satan’s Sister, I often wished the earth would split open and swallow them both like Dathan and Abiram in the Old Testament (Numbers 16:31-33) so we could start over with better candidates.

  • Drop of Ink

        I do everything. Not only have I added SCA President to my pile of responsibilities, but I am now the Bedford Bulletin’s intern until April. For those of you who haven’t heard of me, however, allow me to introduce myself:

        I am Foster Garrett.
        Seventeen years ago, a party raged. People poured in from the streets and filled the house, dancing and chattering. However, the party is not what people remember when they think of that night.
        They remember me.

  • Fanciful ‘facts’ that don’t ring true

        Usually, when John Barnhart and I have a back-and-forth here in our respective columns, I’m happy to let him have the last word. It seems important to him.
        This time, however, I must break precedent, because there were a few claims in his column about Charlottesville that simply must be disputed.