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Columns

  • Preying on the ill informed

        As I’ve mentioned before in this space, all the flap about Confederate monuments is strictly political. It’s an effort by the left to try to make up for their bankrupt ideology. They have no good ideas, so they attack symbols in an effort to give the impression that they are doing something. They are aided by the fact that so many people are ignorant or ill informed about American history.

  • Enhancing our community with autumn decor

    By Vicki Gardner
    Executive Director
    Smith Mountain Lake Regional Chamber of Commerce

        Soon we will welcome Autumn with it’s amazing colors, blue skies and all the joy associated with harvest, feasts, family and togetherness.  Fall in our mountain, lake and quaint ‘towns’ region is prime for tourism.  Now is the time for the business community to roll out the welcome mat leading to your door with a brilliant fall theme.

  • A horrible and disgraceful president

        The American presidency has always been the office we hold in the highest esteem. Our history demonstrates that it should be held by people of the best quality, who are experienced and able to do the job.
        We’ve truly had some giants; the first president, George Washington, set the example of transferring power democratically to the next one, something extremely rare at the time.

  • Slavery is not a modern issue

        I noticed from Rick Howell’s  last column that he’s still fighting battles that were settled 150 years ago. He really needs to do some serious reading on American history. If he does, there are a few facts that he will discover.
        The first fact is that there are no slaves in America. The 13th Amendment, ratified at the end of 1865, outlawed slavery in the entire United States. Today, there are no slaves in the United States and haven’t been any slaves in the United States for 150 years.

  • Christians should be fighting racism

        You’d think that Christian people, who claim to follow a religion that teaches love, tolerance and understanding, would be the first in our world to stand strong against racism, both past and present.
        But in the South, particularly, that just hasn’t been the case. Too often, self-styled Christians have led the way in rationalizing, justifying and defending racist practices and making excuses for the Confederacy.

  • Charlottesville was not about slavery

        Rick Howell was very observant to notice that I didn’t use the word “slavery” in my column on what happened in Charlottesville on Aug. 12.  The reason I did not use the word “slavery” is the same reason Mr. Howell made such big deal over the fact that I did not use the word.

  • Frog Went A Courtin’

        Bedford County naturalist, Mike Roberts, knew the frog he heard serenading from the pond on his father’s farm was not one of several indigenous species that sound off there during the hot summer nights each summer. Days later, and after researching a friend’s frog ap, (yes, there is such a thing), Roberts discovered the raucous sounding amphibian was a male, green tree frog, far removed from its normal geographical range.

  • Rationalizations don’t justify the Confederacy

        The reaction from so many Southern whites to the events of Aug. 12 and thereafter is sadly familiar to many of us who grew up in territories of the old Confederacy, but never bought into the racism.
        We were taught it, to be sure, but with sharp minds and good hearts, we grew to know – from our own experience – that to harbor ill feelings toward someone merely because of the color of their skin was, well, stupid.

  • Remembering Lacey

        August 26 turned out to be a sad day. I was checking out Facebook and I started seeing posts about Lacey Putney’s death. He had died that morning.
        I knew he was in seriously bad health. I would run into his brother, Macon, almost every week and ask “How is Lacey?” The news since early this year was never good, so I wasn’t surprised. Still, the news was distressing and it left me in a gloomy mood for several days.

  • Virginia’s heat climbs while its leaders nap

    By Stephen Nash

        Let’s say you’re inclined to think that the whole climate-change conversation is, okay, overheated. It’s a swelter out there, but so what? It’s late summer n Virginia, right? Give me a minute, just the same,  to make the case that it’s way past time to get a lot more serious about Virginia’s climate future.