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Columns

  • Hope and change

        The first thing that came to my mind when I learned that American voters delivered control of the Senate into Republican hands was “hope and change.” 

  • GOP: Be careful what you want


    The national Republican Party flexed some real muscle on Election Day and got what it wanted, flipping control of the U.S. Senate and increasing its House majority as well.
        Democrats knew they had a tough assignment, defending Senate seats in many states that traditionally vote Republican, including the South, where rural conservatism produces, in knee-jerk fashion, reliable Republican votes.

  • Remembering those who have served

    President Calvin Coolidge once said, “The nation which forgets its defenders will itself be forgotten.” While these words were spoken long ago, they are still words that we must abide by today. We cannot forget our defenders of freedom who have sacrificed so much for this great nation. As Americans, we must remember the men and women who have answered the call to serve both in times of war and peace. Our veterans have stood guard on distant battlefields and here at home to protect the liberties at the core of the United States.

  • A renewed opportunity to forge a brighter future

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

    It is a great honor to represent Fifth District Virginians in Congress, and I am grateful for and humbled by the opportunity to continue serving you for the next two years. Tuesday’s election significantly changed the dynamics in Washington, and with that change comes renewed opportunities to advance policies that will address the most pressing issues facing our country.

     

  • Money wasted

        Time is money.
        For a board of supervisors that prides itself on its thriftiness, the inability to get in tune with the school board and address the construction of a new middle school in the Liberty attendance zone makes little sense.
        This issue isn’t new.
        It’s been on the table for years and was a major player in the reversion agreement between the county and Bedford, prior to reverting to town status.
        So why the delay?

  • Fifth district veterans deserve better

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

    This past week, as our nation came together on Memorial Day to pay tribute to those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country, I traveled across the Fifth District and met with many veterans from Henry County to Brunswick County and from Fauquier County to Danville.

     

  • The Good News

    Then the soldiers of the governor took Jesus into the common hall, and gathered unto him the whole band of soldiers.  And they stripped him, and put on him a scarlet robe.
        And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand: and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, King of the Jews!

  • The gift of the conservatives

        I want to thank Rick Howell for his “Cracker Jack box prize” version of American history in his Liberal Agenda last week. I’ve always thought that liberals must be either ill informed or perverse to believe the things they profess to believe. Mr. Howell has a university degree but, not knowing what all is in the curriculum behind a political science degree, I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt. It may be a bit light on history.

  • Farmers Market takes a step forward

        The community is taking a fruitful step forward as it implements changes to the Bedford Farmers Market.
        The changes should yield a good harvest for both area farmers and their customers.
        The proposed changes are the result of community meetings and a management team overseeing the transition of the market.

  • Different cases, different facts

        One of the negative aspects of our history is that some racial and ethnic groups have been shown favors that others did not get. Black people got the short end of the stick in that respect for generations even after slavery was ended. Black people were subject to de jure discrimination in the South until the 1960s and de facto discrimination in the North for much longer.