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Columns

  • Get out and vote

    hough the statewide elections haven’t generated a lot of excitement in this area, the local town council race in Bedford has been adding to the interest.
        In most years, town council elections take place with little fanfare. Many times the number of candidates on the ballot matches exactly the number of seats open. That is the case in the three, four-year term seats being contested—incumbents Robert Wandrei, James Vest and Steve Rush are running for those.

  • Shameful antics of House Republicans

        Just before the 113th Congress left for its month-long August vacation, House Republicans finally got something done: They voted to sue the president.
        That’s it. And that’s all they’ve got. They’ve accomplished nothing else all year long for the American people.
        The president is to be sued because of executive actions he took to delay some implementations of the new health care law. He has also been cited by Republicans “for doing nothing” on the border crisis.

  • Remembering a great liberal journalist

    2014 is a year of profound anniversaries of events that changed America for the better during the Civil Rights movement.
        It's the 50th anniversary of “Freedom Summer” in Mississippi, a brave and successful effort where young people from across the nation descended upon a primitive and dangerous place to help black residents achieve their right to vote.
        Their work did not end without tragedy, as three civil rights workers were murdered by local rednecks.

  • Maintaining a commitment to individual liberties

    Throughout America’s history, our country has been engaged in a profound debate on the limits of government. In the Federalist Papers, the Founders argued passionately for a federal government that would protect the American people from foreign threats. At the same time, they struggled to create a structure to contain and control that government in order to protect the God-given rights of the American people. In drafting the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, they maintained a careful balance between preserving civil liberties and protecting our citizens from enemy threats.

  • House plan to balance the budget, grow the economy, and protect hardworking taxpayers

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

     

    Just as we have done each of the last four years, the House of Representatives approved an annual budget focused on setting a course for our nation and its future.  The Path to Prosperity budget puts us on a path to fiscal sustainability so we can preserve the promise of this great country for our children and grandchildren. 

     

  • Budgeting for the future

    Each year, families across Virginia set a household budget. Businesses in the Commonwealth, both large and small, do the same. This week, the House of Representatives acted on a budget plan for Fiscal Year 2015, which begins on October 1, 2014. In addition to laying out a blueprint for federal spending, the budget process is also an opportunity to strengthen programs like Medicare and Social Security and expand pro-growth economic reforms like tax reform, domestic energy production, and regulatory reform.

  • A better proposal

        Talk about audacious!
        Or, perhaps “clueless” is the better descriptor.
        Jim Moran, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, recently complained that he and his colleagues are underpaid.
        The Virginia Democrat, whose 8th district abuts Washington, D.C., made his gripe in a recent interview with CQ Roll Call.

  • Historic law triumphed over racism

    Nothing has probably defined the baby boomer generation in America more than the turbulent, inspiring, dangerous, and ultimately successful civil rights movement of the 1950s and ‘60s.
        In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled, in Brown v. Board of Education, that segregated schools were unconstitutional, that it was a violation of the rights of black children to be forced, only because of race, to attend schools that were inferior to those of whites.

  • Would this be legal?

  • It’s not the time to rethink the Libya ban

    Protecting American citizens from terrorist threats both at home and abroad is a fundamental role of the federal government. However, despite Libya’s long history of unrest and ongoing terrorist threats coming from the country, the Executive Branch has proposed reversing a longstanding prohibition against Libyans entering the United States to work in aviation maintenance, flight operations, or to study or train in nuclear-related fields. This shift in policy is misguided and ignores reality.