.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Different cases, different facts

        One of the negative aspects of our history is that some racial and ethnic groups have been shown favors that others did not get. Black people got the short end of the stick in that respect for generations even after slavery was ended. Black people were subject to de jure discrimination in the South until the 1960s and de facto discrimination in the North for much longer.

  • Get out and vote

    hough the statewide elections haven’t generated a lot of excitement in this area, the local town council race in Bedford has been adding to the interest.
        In most years, town council elections take place with little fanfare. Many times the number of candidates on the ballot matches exactly the number of seats open. That is the case in the three, four-year term seats being contested—incumbents Robert Wandrei, James Vest and Steve Rush are running for those.

  • Shameful antics of House Republicans

        Just before the 113th Congress left for its month-long August vacation, House Republicans finally got something done: They voted to sue the president.
        That’s it. And that’s all they’ve got. They’ve accomplished nothing else all year long for the American people.
        The president is to be sued because of executive actions he took to delay some implementations of the new health care law. He has also been cited by Republicans “for doing nothing” on the border crisis.

  • Remembering a great liberal journalist

    2014 is a year of profound anniversaries of events that changed America for the better during the Civil Rights movement.
        It's the 50th anniversary of “Freedom Summer” in Mississippi, a brave and successful effort where young people from across the nation descended upon a primitive and dangerous place to help black residents achieve their right to vote.
        Their work did not end without tragedy, as three civil rights workers were murdered by local rednecks.

  • A Southside community pushes back against federal overreach

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

  • Keeping internet access tax free

    Few people study their telephone and Internet bills closely, but it might be worth taking a second glance next month. Take a close look at your next phone bill, and at the bottom you will see a laundry list of access taxes. But if you look at your Internet service provider’s bill, those access taxes will be missing. Wouldn’t you like to keep it that way?

     

  • McAuliffe slam dunks the House GOP

    House Republicans in the Virginia General Assembly have met their match, and it is Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe.
        Tired of their refusal to reach some reasonable compromise that would have allowed many new Virginians insurance coverage through Medicaid, the governor stuffed the ball on them.
        McAuliffe did exactly what Sen. Creighton Deeds had publicly said he should do: Adopt the general budget but use a line-item veto to reject the refusal to expand Medicaid.

  • The real betrayal

        The workings of a political party hack’s mind are always fascinating. Sometimes they seem to think their party is more important than their state, or the United States itself. It’s even more fascinating when a party hack’s thinking ends up in print.
        That happened last week.

  • Making strides toward enhancing our veterans’ health care

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

  • Making veterans care more accessible

    As more information surfaces, the severe mismanagement and “lack of integrity” within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health system has grown increasingly clear. A nationwide audit of access and wait times at 731 VA facilities was released just days ago. The results were highly alarming and only added to my serious concerns about veterans’ access to medical care. The audit found that more than 57,000 veterans have waited at least 90 days for their first appointment at a VA facility.