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Columns

  • Farmers Market takes a step forward

        The community is taking a fruitful step forward as it implements changes to the Bedford Farmers Market.
        The changes should yield a good harvest for both area farmers and their customers.
        The proposed changes are the result of community meetings and a management team overseeing the transition of the market.

  • Different cases, different facts

        One of the negative aspects of our history is that some racial and ethnic groups have been shown favors that others did not get. Black people got the short end of the stick in that respect for generations even after slavery was ended. Black people were subject to de jure discrimination in the South until the 1960s and de facto discrimination in the North for much longer.

  • Get out and vote

    hough the statewide elections haven’t generated a lot of excitement in this area, the local town council race in Bedford has been adding to the interest.
        In most years, town council elections take place with little fanfare. Many times the number of candidates on the ballot matches exactly the number of seats open. That is the case in the three, four-year term seats being contested—incumbents Robert Wandrei, James Vest and Steve Rush are running for those.

  • Shameful antics of House Republicans

        Just before the 113th Congress left for its month-long August vacation, House Republicans finally got something done: They voted to sue the president.
        That’s it. And that’s all they’ve got. They’ve accomplished nothing else all year long for the American people.
        The president is to be sued because of executive actions he took to delay some implementations of the new health care law. He has also been cited by Republicans “for doing nothing” on the border crisis.

  • Remembering a great liberal journalist

    2014 is a year of profound anniversaries of events that changed America for the better during the Civil Rights movement.
        It's the 50th anniversary of “Freedom Summer” in Mississippi, a brave and successful effort where young people from across the nation descended upon a primitive and dangerous place to help black residents achieve their right to vote.
        Their work did not end without tragedy, as three civil rights workers were murdered by local rednecks.

  • Small businesses are the key to more jobs

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

  • Giving thanks to our men and women in uniform

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

    As we observe Memorial Day, we remember with gratitude all of those brave men and women who have sacrificed their lives while defending our great nation.  To all of those who are and have been members of our armed forces – thank you for all that you have given up in the name of American liberty.

     

  • Maintaining a commitment to individual liberties

    Throughout America’s history, our country has been engaged in a profound debate on the limits of government. In the Federalist Papers, the Founders argued passionately for a federal government that would protect the American people from foreign threats. At the same time, they struggled to create a structure to contain and control that government in order to protect the God-given rights of the American people. In drafting the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, they maintained a careful balance between preserving civil liberties and protecting our citizens from enemy threats.

  • What’s best for everyone

    By Gov. Terry McAuliffe

        When I first made the decision to run for governor, I did so for a simple reason: I believed the knowledge and experience I have accrued from a lifetime in business could help me create jobs, grow and diversify our economy, and lead Virginia forward.

  • Same-sex marriage: Facts are stubborn things

        The legal drive for same-sex marriage is marching throughout the land, as the state of Oregon became, last week, the 13th state in a row where judges ruled laws banning it to be unconstitutional.
        Forces of religion that seek political influence – meaning what we’ve always called “the religious right” – remain opposed to same-sex marriage on purely religious grounds. They don’t seem to understand that American courts don’t work for organized religion.