.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • A Tribute to Allen M. Huddleston

    By James W. Morrison
    Moneta
    Author of Bedford Goes to War

        Allen M. Huddleston died on February 10 at age 96.
        He was a native son of Bedford County who served his country and his community. He is believed to have been the last survivor of the Bedford Boys, the last survivor from Bedford County to have served during World War II in Company A, which had been a National Guard infantry company based in Bedford before it was called to active duty and eventual deployment to Europe. 

  • Bill passes to increase the number of charter schools

    By Senator Steve Newman

        With 140 lawmakers coming to Richmond from every corner of Virginia to process more than 2,000 pieces of legislation in just 60 days, Capitol Square is a very hectic place during session.  With a limited amount of days available to complete our work, the days can be very long.

  • Bill will transform the notion of higher education

        With crossover looming, there was a lot of activity this week in Richmond.  As we pass the halfway point of the 2016 General Assembly session, there’s a lot of activity on the floors of both chambers, where key pieces of legislation are often being debated at great length.

  • Constitutional amendment would allow publically funded charter schools

    By Delegate Terry Austin

  • Losing the lust for empire

        It used to be said of the United Kingdom: “The sun never sets on the British Empire.”
        As a colonial power in the 19th  and early 20th centuries, Great Britain had colonies all over Asia and Africa. It controlled them politically and exploited their natural resources and sent that back home.

  • Scalia’s death was a tragic loss

    When I heard of Antonin Scalia’s death over the weekend, my first thought was “Oh no!!!!”  Scalia was a consistent conservative and, along with Clarence Thomas, was one of the two most scholarly, articulate conservative voices on the Supreme Court.

  • Budget report paints grim outlook

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

    Earlier this month in his State of the Union Address, the President painted a rosy picture of our nation’s economic future, claiming that we have created jobs while cutting deficits.  The President seems to believe that we have done enough to reduce our massive spending deficits, but I believe – and most Americans believe – that the future fiscal health of our nation remains one of the most serious problems facing our children and grandchildren.

     

  • Congressional intent cannot be ignored

    Listen carefully and you’ll hear the sound of bureaucrats scrambling to finalize a flood of new regulations before the end of the year. In fact, the White House chief of staff has promised that President Obama will “do audacious executive action” in his final year in office. This stream of costly, complex federal regulations has touched nearly every aspect of our lives, but regulations coming out of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been some of the most egregious, and at times they’ve ignored the intent of laws enacted by Congress.

  • Gun rights and gun safety take center stage

    By Delegate Terry L. Austin

        I respectfully offer the following brief report on activities in the Virginia General Assembly during the week ending January 30, 2016.

  • Bill to allow judges to carry concealed handgun without permit passes Senate

    By Senator Steve Newman

        Every day this snowy week included legislative action, as both the House and Senate got down to business.  The process of reviewing, considering, and debating the 2,168 bills and over 500 resolutions filed by the 140 members of the General Assembly moved at a brisk pace.