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Editorial

  • Here we go again

    Uh oh. Here we go again.
        At the 11th hour, the Bedford County Board of Supervisors is considering pulling funds away from the school system, once again.
        Last year, the supervisors withheld funds from the school board, as budget negotiations got acrimonious between the two boards. This year should be different. The school board members and school administration have done all they could to keep the lines of communication open between the two boards. There shouldn’t be any surprises.

  • Wear It—Stay Safe!

    With Memorial Day weekend upon us, there will be plenty of opportunities to have fun and stay cool in the water.
        We’re in the middle of National Safe Boating Week (May 19 – 25) which serves as a good reminder for everyone to stay safe while enjoying the water.
        The Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries is reminding all boaters to remember some important safety tips this boating season. 
        One of the most important – always wear a life jacket while on the water. 

  • Banning the Big Gulp

    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg doesn’t want residents in his city drinking Big Gulps—or any other sugary soda offered for sale at more than 16 ounces a pop.
        His position is inconsistent, at best.
        Bloomberg states his goal is to reduce obesity and the Big Gulp is to blame. He claims the heart of the bulging problem is that evil, sugary soda pumping through the veins of NYC’s residents and guests.
        Government must step in, according to Dr. Bloomberg.

  • Quoting Saturday’s graduations

    Jefferson Forest High School
        “In school, you learn and then you are tested. In life, often you are tested and then you learn.” —  JF Principal Tony Francis
        “Be not a slave of your own past.” — JF’s Abbigale Anderson, quoting Ralph Waldo Emerson.

  • Buying votes


        To no one’s surprise, President Obama’s announcement that he plans to grant temporary legal status to close to 1 million illegal immigrants was met with great praise from the Hispanic community.
        That’s certainly what he wanted, wasn’t it. This is all about November.

  • Helping out or taking advantage

    When the worst of times hit, there tends to be two very different scenarios that happen.
        Ideally, dealing with turbulent times brings out the best in folks. They band together, lock arms and plow through whatever problem they face.
        In most cases that seems to have been the case through the recent devastating windstorm that blindsided folks in and around Central Virginia these past two weeks.
        Thousands lost their electricity, but they tapped into the enormous power of a community coming together.

  • Did he really say that?

        “If you’ve been successful, you didn’t get there on your own. You didn’t get there on your own. I’m always struck by people who think, well, it must be because I was just so smart. There are a lot of smart people out there. It must be because I worked harder than everybody else. Let me tell you something -- there are a whole bunch of hardworking people out there.

  • The usual suspects

    The usual suspects showed up following the tragedy in Aurora, Colo., Friday.
        As if someone shooting 70 people in a packed movie theater—killing 12—wasn’t enough, there are always those ready to pounce on any opportunity to get their face on TV, or to use that opportunity to trash an opponent.
        Those included:
        • the political hacks, trying to blame the other Party’s supporters for being at fault;

  • Let the Games begin

    he athletes, by the thousands, gathered together Friday.
        From some 200 countries they came together in London for the 2012 Olympics. The flags were raised, the flame was lit; Paul McCartney sang.
        And then the games began.
        The scene that played out in women’s gymnastics Sunday displayed both the magic and the heartache of the games that will follow the next two weeks.

  • To the dogs

    Early this summer, a Bedford County man received a document seeking to register a new voter from his family. Unfortunately the document was sent to his dog Mozart.
        And Mozart had been dead for two years.
        When the form first came Tim Morris said he laughed at first, thinking the solicitation was a joke. Then he realized it was real.
        And that’s a problem.