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Today's Opinions

  • Congress must reduce government spending

    Just days ago President Obama’s National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform met for the first time.  At that meeting Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke expressed extreme concern over the effect of out-of-control government spending on the future of our nation’s struggling economy.  Bernanke warned that “even after economic and financial conditions have returned to normal, in the absence of further policy actions, the federal budget appears set to remain on an unsustainable path.”  This same message was previously delivered by Peter Orsza

  • Agent Orange retroactive compensation

    In March and April of this year, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) made a couple of important announcements concerning the Agent Orange (AO) disability program.   These included an announcement of the proposed rule published March 25 in the Federal Register stating that about 86,000 Vietnam War veterans, their surviving spouse or estate will be eligible for retroactive disability compensation from the VA – an average of 11.4 years for the veteran and 9.6 years for survivors.

  • Perriello: Ready for a tough fight

        Conventional wisdom in the nation’s capital right now is that Democrats are up against it in this fall’s elections and will probably lose a great many House seats and at least a few seats in the Senate.

        Polling shows a very strong feeling against incumbents, but that feeling goes both ways, against Democrats and Republicans, too.

        The party in power in the White House almost always loses Congressional seats in mid-term elections. It is no different this year.

  • Time to stand for something

        “I believe in Jesus Christ and I want to thank my Lord and Savior for loving me the way He does,” - Nate Boyer, Bedford County Republican Party Chairman.

  • Words are cheap, so don’t expect Congress to participate

    Sixth District Congressman Bob Goodlatte is hoping to reform the often abused earmark process that dominates wasteful spending in Washington, D.C.

        Good luck with that.

        If the healthcare legislation fiasco of this past year taught this nation anything, it’s this – anyone can be bought if the price is right.

  • Letters

    New health reform law

        The debate over a new healthcare reform plan that has been waged for over a year has finally resulted in a law.

        Unfortunately the end of this debate did not yield bi-partisan results, and the law currently going forward will not likely survive the Supreme Court. There are a few reasons I do not support this final law, which are, among others:

  • Bill increases aid for post-high school education

    One of my top priorities in Congress has been increasing access to quality, affordable education. To make our region competitive in the global economy, we must invest in our workforce, starting with pre-K and continuing through college and community college. That’s why I was proud to support the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act, which was included in the health care reconciliation bill that was signed into law on March 30, 2010. This measure will make college more affordable and at no cost to taxpayers by making common-sense reforms to the federal student loan system.

  • Putting Americans back to work

    More than 7 million jobs have been lost in the last three years and over 3 million of those jobs have been lost since the President signed the so-called stimulus plan into law last year.  Unfortunately, these are numbers that the American people are all too familiar with and yet the Congress continues to pursue an agenda that will further threaten American job creators.  While Americans are asking “Where are the jobs?”, the Majority in Congress continues to demonstrate that they do not understand the priorities of our constituents or appreciate how private sector