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Today's Opinions

  • What would ‘Christian America’ really look like?

        Lately, there’s been a lot of speculation about why so many self-styled Christians voted for Donald Trump, especially given Trump’s obvious love of himself and money, his habitual lying, and other major character concerns.
        It seems everyone has settled on 80 percent as the reliable percentage of “Christian conservatives” who voted for Trump. They appear to believe, generally, that whatever faults he has, he is nonetheless carrying out what could be called a “pro-Christian” agenda.

  • “Help Us Help You”

    By Nicole S. Johnson

  • “Help Us Help You”

    By Nicole S. Johnson

  • “Help Us Help You”

    By Nicole S. Johnson

  • “Help Us Help You”

    By Nicole S. Johnson

  • SML property owners no longer own lake front property

    By Bill Brush
    President and Founder of Cut Unnecessary Regulatory Burden, Inc (C.U.R.B.)

        Franklin County Circuit Court Justice Reynolds, on 11 April decided Pressl v APCO in favor of APCO; and on 16 June decided APCO v Nissen, in APCO’s favor. 

  • The Calvin Rice Room

        Calvin Rice is well-known to visitors at the Peaks of Otter. As well he should be. Rice has worked along the Parkway since 1958 and much of that time was spent at the Peaks of Otter Lodge after it opened in 1964.
        Now Rice will be remembered for years to come as visitors gather in the Calvin Rice Room at the Lodge, officially dedicated with a ribbon cutting last Wednesday. The room, which has a splendid view of Abbott Lake and Sharp Top, can be used for conferences, wedding receptions and other events held there.

  • Finding gold

        Two weeks ago a group of people got a look at Bedford’s newest business when Beale’s Brewery opened its doors to host a party. The brew-pub will hold a soft opening this Thursday at noon and open to the public on Saturday.
        This development recycles existing developed property. Instead of plowing over undeveloped land, the developer made use of one of the old industrial buildings that have been moldering along the railroad tracks for decades.