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Today's Opinions

  • Budget has bipartisan support

    The General Assembly completed its business and adjourned its regular session for 2010 just before 6:00 p.m. on March 14.  The final days were dominated by completion of the largest single piece of legislation, the state’s 2010-2012 Biennial Budget.  That budget will set Virginia apart from a lot of other states, as it was balanced without raising taxes.

  • Obviously, a tax hike is needed

    House Minority Leader Ward Armstrong nailed it perfectly some weeks ago when he attempted to sum up the end result of the governor’s budget proposal: “Opening the rest areas and closing the schools.”

        Robert Francis McDonnell has made it clear on more than one occasion that one thing he won’t do is raise taxes.

  • Bipartisanship at its worst

        And he provides that no one should be able to buy or to sell, except the one who has the mark, either the name of the beast or the number of his name. (Revelation 13:17 NASB)

        An article that appeared on page A4 of the Wall Street Journal on March 9 struck me as an example of bipartisanship at its worst — a Republican and a “Democrat” working together on a horrible piece of legislation.

  • Hate mail

        You’ve probably found e-mails like this in your in-box. Somebody from Nigeria wants you to help him with a financial transaction involving huge amounts of money. Or, you get one informing you that you have won some international lottery that you never entered.

  • Letters

    Perfect storm

        For Governor Bob McDonnell, it’s a “perfect storm.”  Virginia’s budget tanks.  He’s elected by a landslide, having made no secret about his conservative legislation and leanings.  Like all conservatives, McDonnell believes less is better relating to government and he hates taxes for government services.  Solution?  Axe public school funding:  Not a dime of tax-payers’ hard-earned money spent, never mind the consequences.

  • The U.S. Census Bureau is recruiting temporary, part-time census takers for the 2010 Census

    Starting next week, households across America will start receiving forms for the 2010 Census. Every 10 years, as defined in the Constitution, the Census takes a snapshot of our population, determining how many people reside within the nation's borders, who they are, and where they live. The results help determine your representation in government, as well as how federal funds are spent in your community on things like roads, parks, housing, schools, and public safety.

  • Stopping job killing energy regulations and taxes

    Late last year the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) took the first steps toward a national energy tax by writing anti-growth regulations that make carbon dioxide – something that is necessary to sustain life on earth – a regulated pollutant under the Clean Air Act.  This backdoor attempt to institute a national energy tax will stifle economic growth and kill jobs, especially in the manufacturing, transportation, energy, and agricultural sectors.  Now more than ever, with the national unemployment rate hovering around 10 percent and 15 million Americans looking for

  • Conference committee now merging Senate and House versions of budget

    We are one week away from our final newsletter which will mark the end of the 2010 General Assembly session.  With the final week of the General Assembly session approaching, senators and delegates are moving quickly toward completing final work on legislation.