Today's Opinions

  • Perriello joins effort to restore public faith in our democratic institutions

    When I came to Congress last year, I promised to fight for economic relief for my constituents, but also to change the way business is done in Washington. For far too long, both parties have answered to the special interests instead of to the people. Sometimes it can seem like Congress is not bound by the same rules as everyone else. It’s time to bring Main Street values of decency, openness, and accountability to the halls of Washington.

  • Keeping the focus on creating jobs

    In recent days we've seen another tough economic blow for our friends and families in Southside Virginia.

    Stanley Furniture, a fixture in Henry County for nearly 90 years, announced it will shutter its factory near Martinsville and relocate more than 560 jobs overseas by the end of this year.

    That tough news came on the heels of promising job announcements by two smaller employers just a few weeks earlier.  In too many of our rural regions, it seems we take one step forward -- and then two steps back.

  • Stalin, U.S. and Allied military deaths, and the D-Day Memorial

    Joseph Stalin bears varying degrees of responsibility for the deaths of over 37,000 American and over 60,000 Allied military personnel, plus the wounding of hundreds of thousands of others, with thousands more being imprisoned or missing in action.

        The plan to erect a bust of Stalin on a pedestal—a place of honor—at the revered National D-Day Memorial should provoke outrage in all American and Allied veterans, their families, and the public at large.

  • Obama’s agenda survives primaries

        Last week’s primary elections in several states did produce much of the anti-incumbent sentiment we’ve heard so much about, but Republicans should not assume it means they’ll take control of anything after November.

        The primaries will be long gone when it’s again football season and the leaves have turned brown. Only then will Americans vote for a new House of Representatives and several new U.S. senators.

  • Will Kagan help unchain the beast?

        Back in 1788, delegates from the 13 original states gathered in Philadelphia to revise the Articles of Confederation, which had governed the United States since they declared themselves independent from Great Britain. Instead of revising this document, they wrote a constitution for a new government, creating a federal republic.

  • Waiting for a decision

    If it wasn’t clear to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder last week, it should be now: Virginia vehemently opposes the transfer of convicted Bedford County double-murderer Jens Soering back to Germany.

        When questioned about the issue by Sixth District Congressman Bob Goodlatte during a congressional committee hearing last week, Holder said he was waiting to see “what the state’s position is going to be.”

  • Letters

    Bravo for the Community Orchestra

        Bravo! Bravo! Bravo for the Bedford Community Orchestra and its May 15 spring concert.

         Saturday was the first time we’ve attended one of the orchestra’s concerts, and we discovered how remiss we’ve been. We’re going to correct that in the future.

        The concert was marvelous—music from a Harry Potter movie, Copeland’s Rodeo, Abreu’s Tico-Tico, Ravel’s Bolero, and Celtic music from Lord of the Dance.

  • The case for financial reform

    In the early days of our republic, President Andrew Jackson established an important principle of American-style democracy – that we should measure the health of our society not at its apex, but at its base.  That focus has been lost, as many on Wall Street have accumulated vast wealth while the middle class falls steadily behind.  When regions of Virginia are experiencing more than 21% unemployment and so many working Americans continue to struggle in this economy, it is only just that our leaders protect the interests of America’s working people.