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Today's Opinions

  • The decline of conservatism?

    Few people would argue that Democrats hold most of the trump cards for this fall’s presidential and Congressional elections. The sustained and intense unpopularity of George W. Bush and his war in Iraq are the main, but not the only, reasons.

    But might there be something else happening, too? Something even more profound than the electoral fortunes of either party?

  • Walking away is unrealistic

    John McCain isn't a crazy man, as Rick Howell suggested in last week's Liberal Agenda. Unlike the "Democratic" Party's far left, John McCain is a realist.

    We can't simply walk away from what we've gotten ourselves into without consequences. This is something that McCain understands, something that the lefties can't grasp.

    Maybe they can grasp it, but just don't want to. Mr. Howell, for example, has advocated twice this year that we walk away from military commitments in East Asia as well as in Iraq.

  • New facility will do alternative fuel research

    With oil now topping $100 a barrel, it becomes even more imperative for American research to lead the way to freeing us from our addiction to foreign oil and petroleum-based products. For several years, I have been supportive of such research in our area, and now a new company is joining in our work.

  • In the end, House Republicans opt for the same old thing

    When election time rolls around there's always plenty of talk of change. The problem, however, is regardless of who is elected, the eventual outcome almost always brings us more of the same.

    Take the recent action in the Virginia House of Delegates, for example.

    After more than 150 years of Democrat-controlled redistricting, the Republicans finally had their shot in 2001 to change the way the process was handled. Instead, it simply meant a new party was in charge.

  • The Senate's obligation to act on federal nominees

    Perhaps one of the most important responsibilities of the United States Senate is to give the President's pending federal nominations a prompt vote in order to ensure that Federal courts and agencies have the personnel they need to best serve the American people.

    Currently, there are more than 180 nominees awaiting a vote in the Senate. Thirty of these nominees have been waiting more than a year for a Senate vote and half have been waiting 100 days or longer. This is simply unacceptable.

  • House rejects earmark reform effort

    One of the big issues that is currently before Congress is earmark reform. An earmark occurs when a member of the House of Representatives or the Senate specifies how a certain amount of money in an agency?s budget is to be spent, most often in the member?s own district or state. In the past, a few of these earmarks had been entered in a conference report and were never included in the floor discussions of the bills.

  • One hundred years in Iraq?

    Several weeks ago, long before Sen. John McCain enjoyed his current status as the Republican Party’s “presumptive nominee” for president, he was holding a campaign rally somewhere.

    With him was pro-Iraqi war Senator Joe Lieberman, a “Democrat” (if I may borrow Dr. Barnhart’s quotation marks) who has endorsed McCain almost exclusively because of their shared passion for “victory” in Iraq.

  • Shortfall leaves General Assembly scrambling for answers

    House Republicans saw the economic downturn coming last year and in January asked Gov. Tim Kaine and his staff for an update to budget revenue projections. That update didn't come until this past week.

    And the outlook wasn't good (a $1.4 billion shortfall) and the timing was late (just days before budget proposals were to be finalized).

    Now significant changes must be made. And they won't be easy.