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Features

  • A terrible traffic accident in 1940, combined with a world war, separated a Bedford County man from his family for more than 60 years.

  •     Ed Hiner grew up in Montvale and graduated from Liberty High School in 1986.

  •     Back in 1949 high school students could drive school buses.

  • By Chappy Merritt

    Contributing Writer

        What started 28 years ago with a group of family and friends deciding to go camping and watch the races at Martinsville Speedway has evolved into at least a four time annual excursion to the track.
        The group attends both Sprint Cup races, the granddaddy of Late Model races in the fall, the July 4th celebration featuring noted country artists and other events when possible.

  • By Regina Carson
    Community Outreach Coordinator
    RVGS

        At the Roanoke Valley Governor’s School for Science and Technology, students are charged each year with carrying out a science fair project.
        This year, Gov. School/Staunton River High School senior Bronson Aznavorian elected to work in the biotechnology field on a project titled Comparing the Efficacy of Homeopathic Treatments in Inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7.

  • By Patricia C. Held

  • By Patricia C Held Contributing writer

        Truck driver, lawyer, carpenter, engineer … these are a few of the career choices children consider when growing up.

  •     They say that, if you look far enough up your family tree, you will probably find somebody hanging. Jennifer Thomson, genealogical librarian at the Bedford Museum and Genealogical Library, has been researching her family tree. While she didn’t find anybody hanging, she did find something interesting in the foliage.

  •     When Diane Fanning was 9 years old, a man attempted to abduct her.

  •     Main Street United Methodist Church’s wood ministry is ready for its 13th year of helping people keep warm.

        According to Roger M. Layne, who heads up the ministry, volunteers will be working from a wood pile that is 65-feet long, six-and-a-half feet high and 17 rows wide. Each row is between 15 and 18 inches long.

  •     Gene Thomas, a Bedford native and 1971 Liberty High School grad, has loved art since his elementary school days.

        “I started drawing when I was in fourth grade,” he said.
        He was also fascinated with military aircraft from the time he was in elementary school. His drawings came from photographs in a book called “Fighting Aces in the Pacific.”

  •     Trying to keep a house cool in the summer and warm in the winter was a challenge 200 years ago, even if you happened to be Thomas Jefferson.

         Jefferson’s retreat, Poplar Forest, located in Forest shows how he did it, as best he could.
        “You have to start with the structure,” said Travis McDonald, Poplar Forest’s director of architectural restoration.

  •     For more than 30 years, adults, youth and children from all over Virginia have been converging on Eagle Eyrie Baptist Conference Center, between Big Island and Coleman Falls. 

  •     Matt and Davannah Byers are hoping to spread the word.

        Their 8-year-old autistic son has a rare form of photosensitive epilepsy and they want to raise awareness about the condition.
        And maybe even help another family who is going through the same struggles they face on a daily basis.
        “We want to reach other people,” Matt said.

  •     Dr. William B. Robertson is a brilliant fundraiser. Camp Virginia Jaycee exists because of his fundraising prowess.

        He is also a builder of men. This past week he was in the area doing both.

    The camp
        Back in 1968, Dr. Robertson got the vision for building a camp for special needs people, along with the idea of how to raise money to build it. His idea was to by jars of apple jelly, wholesale, for 15 cents each and sell them for $1 each.

  •     If you enjoy Smith Mountain Lake, then you should thank Dr. Jeffrey Fong.

        Smith Mountain Lake exists because Smith Mountain Dam holds back the Roanoke River at a gap in Smith Mountain. Dr. Fong is the engineer who designed the dam.

  •     Frederic Bibia of France decided to honor Bedford’s fallen soldiers from D-Day on the 70th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy by Allied troops.

  •     In December, the house built in 1891 that was home to Josephine Bibb—a well-known Bedford teacher from her birth until her death in 2003—caught fire. The house was damaged beyond repair and what was left of it was demolished a month later.
        But that was then.
        Now, a new house is rising at its site and, while it will look like a Victorian house, it’s being built using the most modern construction techniques.

    The owners

  •     Gabrielle Clauser, a Bedford County homeschooler who recently turned 15, loves horses.

        She’s been riding since she was 7 and is planing on becoming a veterinarian specializing in horses.
        The love of horses started with a summer camp. Clauser said that her mother asked her if she wanted to go to summer camp. Summer camps were not exactly her cup of tea, but this one involved horses. That got her attention and she decided to try it.

  •     About 300 motorcycle-riding veterans, part of the Run for the Wall event, will roll though Bedford County on their way to Washington D. C. next week.

         Their destination is the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, “The Wall.” Their goal is to remind people of the men who didn’t come home, both killed in action and missing in action (MIA).