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Features

  •     Brigadier General Lapthe Flora recalls his first meeting with his platoon sergeant when, as a second lieutenant, he took command of of a platoon in Clifton Forge’s Company C. The sergeant was a Vietnam veteran.

  • The National D-Day Memorial Foundation has been accumulating a collection of D-Day related artifacts and documents for nearly 20 years. One of the most unusual is a vintage bottle of Calvados, a Norman apple brandy. The bottle belonged to Earl Draper.

  • By Patricia C Held
    Contributing Writer
    news@bedfordbulletin.com
     

  •     Jake Russell was 3 years old when he started having pain in his leg.

        His parents initially thought he might have injured his leg in a fall so they took  him to the doctor. An initial exam revealed Jake didn’t have an infection and that there wasn’t any break.
        More tests were run and soon they realized the diagnosis was much worse.
        Jake had cancer – specifically Ewing’s sarcoma.

  •     Last year’s renovation of the bell tower on Bedford’s courthouse included repairs to the clock. Long before that, however, Edward Stanley worked on the clock and made sure it rang on the half-hour, along with tolling on the hour.

        Stanley always liked clocks and repaired them as a hobby when he was a child.

  •     Larry Minnis and his son, Kevin, represent third and fourth generations of their family to work at the paper mill in Big Island.

        The first generation was Jessie Minnis, Larry’s grandfather. The second was Larry’s father, Marshall, who started in 1939. Larry’s uncle, J. W. Reynolds was the mill’s first black supervisor.
        Kevin noted that his maternal great-grandfather, Gilbert Spinner, also worked at the mill.

  • By April Cheek-Messier
    President
    National D-Day
    Memorial Foundation

        Seventy-five years ago, on February 20, 1941, a group of hale and hearty American boys kissed mothers and girlfriends goodbye, picked up their duffels, and filed in good order onto a train in Bedford, Virginia.
        None could know it, but they were departing for an unexpected rendezvous with history. They were Company A of the 116th Regiment, 29th Division—better known as the Bedford Boys.

  • Eva Arthur, who grew up near Ivy Creek, celebrated her 100th birthday at Carriage Hill last week.    

        Arthur grew up on a farm at the foot of Jackson Mountain. She got lots of exercise when she was young. She had no transportation and frequently walked up, down and around Jackson Mountain “running after cows.”
        The family didn’t raise cattle, but they had two Jersey cows that provided milk for their own use. Arthur helped milk the cows every morning.

  •     Milking a cow, sitting in the cockpit of an airplane with the pilot and collecting honey from a bee hive are some of the activities youngsters and parents enjoy during Field Trip Fun.

  •     Because of kidney failure, Sue Wilken must have dialysis three times a week. It’s a very unpleasant process.

        “It’s painful to have those needles stuck in you,” she said.
        However, good came out of a bad situation. Before she went on dialysis, Wilken, who is five-feet, six-inches tall weighed 285 pounds.
        “I was eating a lot of fast foods,” she said. “I just kept putting on the weight.

  • A terrible traffic accident in 1940, combined with a world war, separated a Bedford County man from his family for more than 60 years.

  •     Ed Hiner grew up in Montvale and graduated from Liberty High School in 1986.

  •     Back in 1949 high school students could drive school buses.

  • By Chappy Merritt

    Contributing Writer

        What started 28 years ago with a group of family and friends deciding to go camping and watch the races at Martinsville Speedway has evolved into at least a four time annual excursion to the track.
        The group attends both Sprint Cup races, the granddaddy of Late Model races in the fall, the July 4th celebration featuring noted country artists and other events when possible.

  • By Regina Carson
    Community Outreach Coordinator
    RVGS

        At the Roanoke Valley Governor’s School for Science and Technology, students are charged each year with carrying out a science fair project.
        This year, Gov. School/Staunton River High School senior Bronson Aznavorian elected to work in the biotechnology field on a project titled Comparing the Efficacy of Homeopathic Treatments in Inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7.

  • By Patricia C. Held

  • By Patricia C Held Contributing writer

        Truck driver, lawyer, carpenter, engineer … these are a few of the career choices children consider when growing up.

  •     They say that, if you look far enough up your family tree, you will probably find somebody hanging. Jennifer Thomson, genealogical librarian at the Bedford Museum and Genealogical Library, has been researching her family tree. While she didn’t find anybody hanging, she did find something interesting in the foliage.

  •     When Diane Fanning was 9 years old, a man attempted to abduct her.

  •     Main Street United Methodist Church’s wood ministry is ready for its 13th year of helping people keep warm.

        According to Roger M. Layne, who heads up the ministry, volunteers will be working from a wood pile that is 65-feet long, six-and-a-half feet high and 17 rows wide. Each row is between 15 and 18 inches long.