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Features

  • Just more than 45 years ago, Bill Robertson had set a plan in motion.

  •     Brook Hill Farm, located on Bellevue Road in Forest, was established in 2001 as a horse rehabilitation center.

  • Bedford Town Councilman Robert Carson is concerned about bullying and has started a campaign to draw attention to the problem and get people talking about it. He’s begun by distributing buttons that read “I take a stand against bullying!”

        “Most of the buttons of my first order have gone,” he said. Some have gone as far as Tennessee.
        Bullying can take multiple forms. It can be physical, but it can also be verbal. Carson notes that it’s possible to destroy another person with your words.

  •     Holy Name of Mary and Resurrection are the only two Roman Catholic churches in Bedford County. 

  • By Catherine Cary
    Communication student
    Virginia Tech

        Genevieve Metcalf is no ordinary 3-year-old girl. She loves dinosaurs, lizards and superheroes. Little did anyone know, her favorite superheroes are not the only fighters.
        Genevieve is a curious and rambunctious girl who loves to climb and play in the dirt. She always has a ton of energy and never stops moving.
        “Sleeping and eating are the last things on her mind,” Sarah Metcalf, mother of Genevieve, said.

  •     Liberty Lodge, Bedford’s Masonic Lodge, will celebrate its founding, Saturday. There won’t be any charter members, however. That’s because the Lodge was chartered in 1813, 200 years ago. It got its name because Bedford was named Liberty back then.

        The Lodge was organized on July 6, 1813, and received its official charter on Dec. 14, 1813. It met in the home of Charles Mitchell which, Carl Wells, the Lodge’s chaplain, believes was located at the corner of East Main Street and Otey Street.

  •     “I am proud I am an Army brat,” said Anita Beard as she opened her talk before the New Beginnings support group recently.

        Beard, who now lives in Bedford County, is the daughter of Col. James E. Foster, a career Army officer.
        Military brats are what the children of career members of the armed forces call themselves. They often use the more specific designation of Army brat, Navy brat, and so forth, indicating their father’s specific branch of service.

  •     Carole Rogers of Bedford knits all year.

        A lot.
        Enough, in fact, to provide 75 sweaters and 125 hats and scarves to a program that gives one of each to students at a Bedford or Franklin County school each year.

  • Bedford Fire Department has been answering the call—everyone of them.

  • One of the worst train wrecks in Virginia history occurred in the wee hours of the morning of July 2, 1889, when a passenger train traveling eastward from Roanoke didn’t quite make it to Thaxton. Now “Lost at Thaxton,” the result of 18 months of research by Michael Jones brings that tragic night to life for readers.

  •     Thirty of the finest young scientific minds congregated in Washington, D.C., last week.

  •     Veterans of all sorts frequently visit the National D-Day Memorial. Last Friday, John Fatino, an atomic veteran, took a tour.

  • Dixie Boys Baseball, Inc. announces that they will formally honor Andy Dooley as a member of their Hall of Fame. The recognition ceremony will be held on October 19, 2013 at the Moose Lodge in Bedford. Dooley is a current resident of Thaxton.

  •     A book written by Mary Ellen Gallaher two years ago, called “Nobody’s Home,” sparked memories for a number of people who grew up in the Perrowville community in the 1930s and 1940s.

  • Ruby Laughon grew up on a tobacco farm that has been in her family since the end of the 19th century.

  •     One of these days it's likely Alexis Brown will be known as Dr. Brown.

     The 2013 Jefferson Forest High School (JFHS) graduate is headed off to the College of William and Mary, the second oldest university in the United States; she is enrolled in a pre-med program.

  •     Gary M. Seay, who now lives in the Westlake area, dropped out of high school to join the Army back in the late 1940s. He was looking for adventure, and a chance to make money.

  • After retiring as the president of an executive search firm, Dick Mendel was looking for a place to spend his retirement.

        He wanted an area with four seasons. His executive recruitment firm was based in Texas, but he is a Catskill Mountain boy, so he was looking for a green location. Mendel settled on Virginia, after some research and rented a house in Roanoke while he conducted a search.
        He settled on a house in Body Camp that needs a lot of work, but it’s a historic house.

  •     Back in 2001, Robert Miller, a local photographer, weighed a quarter of a ton.
        He had always been heavy, even as a teen, and he continued to gain weight. By the time he reached 548 pounds, many everyday activities had become difficult. Simply walking a short distance across a level floor would leave him breathing hard.
        Miller was  morbidly obese. The  medical  term means that he was at least three times his ideal weight. It also meant that his obesity would eventually kill him.