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Features

  •     Thirty of the finest young scientific minds congregated in Washington, D.C., last week.

  •     Veterans of all sorts frequently visit the National D-Day Memorial. Last Friday, John Fatino, an atomic veteran, took a tour.

  • Dixie Boys Baseball, Inc. announces that they will formally honor Andy Dooley as a member of their Hall of Fame. The recognition ceremony will be held on October 19, 2013 at the Moose Lodge in Bedford. Dooley is a current resident of Thaxton.

  •     A book written by Mary Ellen Gallaher two years ago, called “Nobody’s Home,” sparked memories for a number of people who grew up in the Perrowville community in the 1930s and 1940s.

  • Ruby Laughon grew up on a tobacco farm that has been in her family since the end of the 19th century.

  •     One of these days it's likely Alexis Brown will be known as Dr. Brown.

     The 2013 Jefferson Forest High School (JFHS) graduate is headed off to the College of William and Mary, the second oldest university in the United States; she is enrolled in a pre-med program.

  •     Gary M. Seay, who now lives in the Westlake area, dropped out of high school to join the Army back in the late 1940s. He was looking for adventure, and a chance to make money.

  • After retiring as the president of an executive search firm, Dick Mendel was looking for a place to spend his retirement.

        He wanted an area with four seasons. His executive recruitment firm was based in Texas, but he is a Catskill Mountain boy, so he was looking for a green location. Mendel settled on Virginia, after some research and rented a house in Roanoke while he conducted a search.
        He settled on a house in Body Camp that needs a lot of work, but it’s a historic house.

  •     Back in 2001, Robert Miller, a local photographer, weighed a quarter of a ton.
        He had always been heavy, even as a teen, and he continued to gain weight. By the time he reached 548 pounds, many everyday activities had become difficult. Simply walking a short distance across a level floor would leave him breathing hard.
        Miller was  morbidly obese. The  medical  term means that he was at least three times his ideal weight. It also meant that his obesity would eventually kill him.

  •     You don’t win a Purple Heart:  You earn it.

        And, rare is the man who wants to earn one.
        Still, those that have done so are in a special class:    They’ve taken one for the team and have the scars to prove it.
        Roy Scott is such a man.
        A Forest  resident (Boonsboro area), Scott earned a pair of Purple Hearts in Vietnam.

  • Sign-ups and notices

     

    County Rec Cheese Shop trip

  •     Destroyer sailors don’t expect a smooth ride when they ship out aboard a tin can, the nickname these fast warships acquired.
        With hulls that are long in comparison to their beam, destroyers are built for speed. Photos, particularly of older destroyers, will often show one of these ships riding over the crest of a swell with its bow completely out of the water. Back in 1952, Bruce Clarke, who owns a farm in Chamblissburg, had a rougher ride than normal when his destroyer struck a mine.

  •     He’ll let you get away with forgetting plenty of things.
        -You can forget an appointment to meet with him.  No sweat!
        -You can forget to bring an umbrella on a rainy afternoon.  That’s OK.
        -You can forget what day of the week it is.  No worries!
        But, as far as Steve Bozeman is concerned, you’d best not forget about our military.  That’s the one thing he won’t forgive.

  • Danny Johnson, of Johnson’s Orchard, felt like he lost an older brother when Thomas Owen Phillips died of cancer on Nov. 15.

  • Sign-ups and notices

     

    Oktoberfest at Historic Avenel

  •     Robert A. (Tony) Dill is coming up on the first anniversary of a new career.

  •     Esmond Eugene Cocke, who lives north of Bedford, was living on a 400-acre farm where his father was a share-cropper, raising corn, cattle and pigs, when Uncle Sam sent him a written invitation to participate in World War II.

        It was 1943; Cocke was 18.
        “They gave me a choice when I went in,” he said. It would be a life-altering decision.

  •     One of the current residents of the Elks National Home originally lived there for a couple of years as a teenager during World War II.

        Sheridan Besosa was 13 and living in Puerto Rico when the United States entered the war.

  •     Years ago when Susan Coryell lived in Northern Virginia, she started writing a novel about a haunted  Revolutionary War era estate nearby.

        But then she moved to Smith Mountain Lake.
        Her address changed, but her desire to write didn’t. Coryell decided to continue working on her novel, “A Red, Red Rose,” but move the setting to a lake.

  •     Christy Witt couldn’t be any prouder of her daughter.

        And thankful.
        Morgan Witt, 10, has been keeping a sharp lookout for her 3-year-old brother Kaden this summer.
        A couple of weeks ago, the Witt family was camping at Holliday Lake State Park. Morgan had gone for a walk down the trail in the woods and came back to camp carrying a baby frog. A little while later she and her brother went back down the trail to return the frog to the creek.