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Features

  • By Peter Sawyer
    Intern writer
    news@bedfordbulletin.com


        Bear Frazer, based in Bedford, hopes to break into the movie industry with his recent pitch film The Bam Theory.
        Frazer is from New York, but moved to Bedford with his family in 2001.  Frazer said he was always interested in writing and was creative as a child, but his interest in screenwriting started in 2002 when he bought books on screenwriting.  He also began writing and studying scripts.

  • When Danny and Nancy Johnson, of Johnson’s Orchards, got married in 1961, the Rev. Eugene Campbell performed the ceremony. When the Johnsons' son, Shannon, and his wife, Donna, exchanged their vows, the Rev. Eugene Campbell officiated. When the Johnsons' grandson, Jordon, and his wife, Lindsey, were married at the end of last year, the Rev. Eugene Campbell married them.

        It helps to have a pastor in the family.

  • Haiti is hot and humid all the time, although it can get down into the 60s on the little country’s central plateau. Diseases are a problem — malaria, tuberculosis, typhoid, some hepatitis, tetanus. Nevertheless, Bob Routh and Adele Dellavalle-Routh are frequent visitors. Most years, they go down there twice.

  •     Mary Bruce Terry, 83, of Bedford, died Monday, Nov. 15, 2010 at her residence. She was born March 23, 1927 a daughter of the late Carl Bruce and Julia King Bruce.

        Mary was a loyal member of Longwood Avenue Baptist Church and loved her church. She ran Terryland Nursery for many years.
        In addition to her parents Mary was preceded in death by her husband, Tech. Sgt. William Robert Terry, and a great-grand daughter, Marissa Burnette; also two sisters and four brothers.

  •     Bryant Counseling has a counselor whose life has taken her to a variety of places, including a few years in Armenia.

        Avery Flory, a North Carolina native, originally received a degree in economics from Queens University in Charlotte, N.C. She followed a career in that field that included working as a fundraiser for a hospital and a stint selling securities. Over the years, however, her focus changed. She went back to school after her children grew up, earned a master’s degree in counseling and began practicing in 2000.

  • Dr. Samir Ghobrial has been working in Bedford for a long time.
        “It will be 21 years come January 1,” he said.

        During those years he has delivered about 3,000 babies. Before Bedford Memorial Hospital closed its maternity ward, Dr. Ghobrial found himself occasionally delivering the babies of babies he had delivered at the beginning of his practice here.

  •     Keith Coles Jr., a 12-year-old who lives in Bedford, is alive today because somebody in New York chose to be an organ donor.

  • Girl:  “What are you rebelling against, Johnny?”

    Johnny Strabler: “What do you got?”
        -Scene from “The Wild One”

        Marlon Brando’s depiction of Johnny Strabler helped sear  the image of the tough motorcyclist into the consciousness of the American public.
        Motorcycle gangs such as Hell’s Angels, the Pagans and other “Outlaw Motorcycle Groups,” have done little to change that image.

  • Louise Noell lives in a nice comfortable home today, but her early years were rough.

        Noell was born in Appomattox on Sept. 24, 1910, a daughter of Joseph O’Brien, a Bedford native. Noell originally started school there, but had to leave school after third grade in order to help care for her siblings — four brothers and two sisters — after her mother’s death.

  • Patrick Henry Boys & Girls Plantation has a new executive director. Local residents had a chance to meet him at a meet and greet at their Bedford facility, located on Dickerson Mill Road, this past Saturday.

  • The New London Airport will have its 41st annual Down-Home Fly In this Sunday.

        It’s a special day because it falls on the birthday of the airport’s founder. Rucker Tibbs turns 87 that day — at least, Tibbs says he will turn 87 that day if his wife doesn’t kill him first.

  • Boy Scout Troop 183 is celebrating its anniversary this weekend.

        The troop started in 1957 and was originally sponsored by St. John’s Episcopal Church. Harold Wilkes was the first scout master and the Rev. G. William Beale was rector of St. John’s at the time. The troop became associated with Bedford Presbyterian Church in the 1980s and both churches jointly sponsor it. They meet in a facility owned by Bedford Presbyterian on Center Street. It is the oldest continuing troop in the Bedford area.

  • A bout of bad health may have saved a man’s life nearly 70 years ago.

  • Though most of the members of the band Solrevolt have a common background in law enforcement, it’s their music that is the binding factor — not their job.

        In other words, according to band member Rick Drewery, their jobs might have brought them together, but the music is what really matters. And now they have produced their own CD.

  •     Carriage Hill is now under new management.

        T. J. M. Properties, of Clearwater, Fla., purchased the retirement community last year. According to Chris Davis, Carriage Hill’s executive director, T. J. M. specializes in assisted living, skilled care and independent living facilities. He said that facilities like Carriage Hill are the heart of what the company does. It currently has 11 facilities and acquiring Carriage Hill was the beginning of an expansion into Virginia. He anticipates having two more by the end of the year.

  • One of Oakwood Manor’s residents will turn 109 this Saturday.

        Mary Spinner was born on Feb. 20, 1901, the third of 10 children born to William and Frances (Fannie) Sledd.

        Sledd owned a 150 acre farm in the Big Island area, off Va. 122, and raised cattle, pigs and tobacco for market in the early years of the 20th century.  They also grew corn and hay to feed the animals, and peas and cane for sorghum molasses for their family’s use. William ran the farm and Frances handled all the couple’s financial affairs.

  • A partnership between Bedford Science and Technology Center’s (BSTC) electricity program and Southern Air has paid off for both.

        Aaron Payne teaches the electricity course at BSTC, a two-year program. Payne hails from Philadelphia and has been teaching for 14 years, five of them at BSTC. Like many people teaching vocational programs, Payne has actually worked in the trade.

        “Before teaching, I was an electrical superintendent,” he said. “I worked for Moore’s Electric.”

  • The snow we had last month has been a bit of a setback for a new business in Huddleston.

        Kim Dunford Laverty opened the The Clubhouse Cafe on Dec. 2. It gets its name due to the fact that it actually is in the Mariners Landing Golf Course clubhouse. A lot of her customers are golfers and she has them even in the winter.

        “They golf year round,” she said. “They’re a great bunch of guys.”

        But, they can’t golf when the course is snow covered.

  • You might say local historian and author Peter Viemeister has found “Lightning” in “The Box.”

        The lightning is Viemeister’s five decade old book “The Lightning Book” and the box is a movie by that title, “The Box,” in which Viemeister’s book is used as a prop.

  • hat do you do when you’re on death row, waiting to take your seat in the electric chair?

        If you were Floyd Allen, one of two men convicted and executed for murder in what’s sometimes known as the Hillsville massacre or Carroll County Courthouse shootout, you made a fairly elaborate wooden sculpture.