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Features

  • Girl:  “What are you rebelling against, Johnny?”

    Johnny Strabler: “What do you got?”
        -Scene from “The Wild One”

        Marlon Brando’s depiction of Johnny Strabler helped sear  the image of the tough motorcyclist into the consciousness of the American public.
        Motorcycle gangs such as Hell’s Angels, the Pagans and other “Outlaw Motorcycle Groups,” have done little to change that image.

  • Louise Noell lives in a nice comfortable home today, but her early years were rough.

        Noell was born in Appomattox on Sept. 24, 1910, a daughter of Joseph O’Brien, a Bedford native. Noell originally started school there, but had to leave school after third grade in order to help care for her siblings — four brothers and two sisters — after her mother’s death.

  • Patrick Henry Boys & Girls Plantation has a new executive director. Local residents had a chance to meet him at a meet and greet at their Bedford facility, located on Dickerson Mill Road, this past Saturday.

  • The New London Airport will have its 41st annual Down-Home Fly In this Sunday.

        It’s a special day because it falls on the birthday of the airport’s founder. Rucker Tibbs turns 87 that day — at least, Tibbs says he will turn 87 that day if his wife doesn’t kill him first.

  • Boy Scout Troop 183 is celebrating its anniversary this weekend.

        The troop started in 1957 and was originally sponsored by St. John’s Episcopal Church. Harold Wilkes was the first scout master and the Rev. G. William Beale was rector of St. John’s at the time. The troop became associated with Bedford Presbyterian Church in the 1980s and both churches jointly sponsor it. They meet in a facility owned by Bedford Presbyterian on Center Street. It is the oldest continuing troop in the Bedford area.

  • A bout of bad health may have saved a man’s life nearly 70 years ago.

  • Though most of the members of the band Solrevolt have a common background in law enforcement, it’s their music that is the binding factor — not their job.

        In other words, according to band member Rick Drewery, their jobs might have brought them together, but the music is what really matters. And now they have produced their own CD.

  •     Carriage Hill is now under new management.

        T. J. M. Properties, of Clearwater, Fla., purchased the retirement community last year. According to Chris Davis, Carriage Hill’s executive director, T. J. M. specializes in assisted living, skilled care and independent living facilities. He said that facilities like Carriage Hill are the heart of what the company does. It currently has 11 facilities and acquiring Carriage Hill was the beginning of an expansion into Virginia. He anticipates having two more by the end of the year.

  • One of Oakwood Manor’s residents will turn 109 this Saturday.

        Mary Spinner was born on Feb. 20, 1901, the third of 10 children born to William and Frances (Fannie) Sledd.

        Sledd owned a 150 acre farm in the Big Island area, off Va. 122, and raised cattle, pigs and tobacco for market in the early years of the 20th century.  They also grew corn and hay to feed the animals, and peas and cane for sorghum molasses for their family’s use. William ran the farm and Frances handled all the couple’s financial affairs.

  • A partnership between Bedford Science and Technology Center’s (BSTC) electricity program and Southern Air has paid off for both.

        Aaron Payne teaches the electricity course at BSTC, a two-year program. Payne hails from Philadelphia and has been teaching for 14 years, five of them at BSTC. Like many people teaching vocational programs, Payne has actually worked in the trade.

        “Before teaching, I was an electrical superintendent,” he said. “I worked for Moore’s Electric.”

  • The snow we had last month has been a bit of a setback for a new business in Huddleston.

        Kim Dunford Laverty opened the The Clubhouse Cafe on Dec. 2. It gets its name due to the fact that it actually is in the Mariners Landing Golf Course clubhouse. A lot of her customers are golfers and she has them even in the winter.

        “They golf year round,” she said. “They’re a great bunch of guys.”

        But, they can’t golf when the course is snow covered.

  • You might say local historian and author Peter Viemeister has found “Lightning” in “The Box.”

        The lightning is Viemeister’s five decade old book “The Lightning Book” and the box is a movie by that title, “The Box,” in which Viemeister’s book is used as a prop.

  • hat do you do when you’re on death row, waiting to take your seat in the electric chair?

        If you were Floyd Allen, one of two men convicted and executed for murder in what’s sometimes known as the Hillsville massacre or Carroll County Courthouse shootout, you made a fairly elaborate wooden sculpture.

  • Mickey Johnson’s team at the Mobile Electronics Competition Association’s world competition, held in Nashville, Tenn., was appropriately named “Ground Shakaz.”

  •     Though tough economic times have hit other projects hard, the Downtown Moneta and Mayberry Hills development is adjusting and thriving.

        New leases are being signed, new residential units are being built and people are being drawn to the area.

        According to developer George Aznavorian, people are looking for ways to have affordable evenings out. Hence Downtown Celebrations, an effort to provide free entertainment while attracting people to the stores there.

  • The minimum age to be a CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) is 21. Chelsea Clemons, who is 22, is the youngest CASA working out of the Bedford office.

        CASAs are appointed by the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court when a case comes before the court that involves children. The CASA’s job is to look out for the children’s interests and prepare a report for the judge. All CASAs are volunteers.

  • From the time Collage, Liberty High School’s literary magazine, fired back up four years ago it has garnered national attention.

        And it continues to do so.

  • Bedford County has the fourth largest horse population in Virginia, according to Richard Toms. That was part of the inspiration to start a new organization that actually began in January with seven people and now has grown to 65.

  • The Bedford County’s Sheriff’s Office has a long and storied history.  The county’s first sheriff, Joseph Ray, took office when Bedford County was first formed in 1754.

        Now it is in the process of compiling as much of that as possible.