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Today's News

  • Democratic congressional hopeful visits Bedford

    Tom Perriello, the Democrat seeking the 5th Congressional District seat held by Republican Virgil Goode, stopped by the Gingerbread Caf?onday on a tour though the district.

    Perriello said that two areas at the top of his priority list are jobs and national security.

    In order for people to have jobs, the workforce in the 5th District must become more competitive. He believes that outcompeting others is the only long-term economic solution for the area.

    "That means more training and better education," he said.

  • Bedford to look at reverting to town status

    Forty years after voting to establish itself as a city of the second class, City of Bedford officials are now in talks with Bedford County officials aimed at returning Bedford to town status.

    Following a closed door meeting of the City/County Relations Committee Monday, Bedford Mayor Skip Tharp and Supervisor's Chairman Steve Arrington, announced that both jurisdictions were studying the proposal, at the request of the city.

  • Letters

    Supervisors made bad decision

    Speaking for myself, as a minister who has served this community for 13 years I am shocked by the story ("Supervisors Deny Townhouse Request", March 12) of a company being denied a permit to build townhouses for its seasonal workers, apparently because the seasonal workers were Hispanic.

    Although I have not spoken directly to anyone involved with anyone involved the story as written is shocking on several levels.

  • Protecting our children

    It has become almost commonplace to turn on the evening news or visit an online news source and see the headlines detailing a terrible crime involving a child. While most of us shudder at the thought of a child being harmed, each year hundreds of thousands of children are victims of abuse, neglect, or violence.

    It is time that we take back our communities and strengthen protections for our children.

  • Drilling in ANWR should be permitted

    On the way to a meeting last week, I stopped to talk with some farmers. One of them was quick to point out how to improve our economy. “We don’t need a check in the mail,” he said, adding, “We need to bring down the cost of gasoline.” I agree.

  • Youth can make the difference

    When it comes to drug use in Bedford, youth can make the difference.

    This is the conclusion from a report about drug abuse student councils in colleges. This could also be applied to junior high schools and high schools.

  • A day in the life: Martinsville race day

    For Conor Murphy, taking a road trip to Martinsville Speedway last weekend with four of his friends from the University of Virginia business school was a last chance for them all to be together.

    In a couple of weeks they all graduate and head their separate ways. "We were close enough to come here," he said Sunday morning as the friends sat around the warmth of a fire. "It was one of those opportunities," he added, that just couldn't be passed up.

  • Fitness with a personal touch

    A new business has opened at in the Smith Mountain Lake area that offers a personal touch to fitness.

    "It's our passion," commented Dwight Ward who, with Rob Jordan, opened Smith Mountain Lake Wellness and Fitness this month.

    The business, located on U. S. 122, a short distance from Hales Ford Bridge on the Bedford County side of the lake, offers personal fitness training. The goal is to help people develop healthy lifestyles.

  • Run over by The Bus

    Sebastiano Stia has been run over by "The Bus."

    Stia currently lives on Scruggs Road on the Franklin County side of Smith Mountain Lake. A few years ago, he was working on a freelance photo assignment which took him to a Pittsburgh Steelers-Philadelphia Eagles game. This work gets a man on the sidelines of pro football games. A sports photographer needs to be alert and quick as more than getting good shots is at stake. At one point during this game, Stia was just not quick enough.

    "Jerome Bettis is running with the ball," Stia recalled.

  • U.S. deaths in Iraq pass 4,000

    Iraq war death number 4,000 happened as a result of a roadside bomb, which has been a typical way our troops have died in that war.

    As we reached this dubious milestone in a war that seemingly has no end, the USA Today newspaper made a commendable effort to put names and details on the numbers.

    It reported, for example, that more than half (52 percent) of the 4,000 U.S. deaths were from bombs. Only 16 percent died by enemy gunfire.