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Today's News

  • Study: Sludge-based fertilizer may be causing human illnesses

        CHAPEL HILL, NC —Treated municipal sewage sludge—the solids from sewage treatment—may be causing illness in people up to a mile from where it is spread on land, according to a recent study.
        Those are the findings from researchers at the Department of Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina’s Gillings School of Global Public Health.

  • House of Representatives

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

    This past week, the House of Representatives introduced our budget priorities and we considered two important pieces of legislation to reduce the size and scope of the federal government and get 5th District Virginians and all Americans back to work.

     

    HOUSE BUDGET

     

  • Budgeting for the future

    Each year the House of Representatives is responsible for producing a budget for the upcoming fiscal year. This week, House Republicans introduced our budget plan, The Path to Prosperity. The House plan is a responsible step in the right direction and tackles our spending problem head-on.

     

  • Cultivating Big Dreams on a Small Scale

    By J. Calvin Parrish
    State Executive Director
    USDA – Farm Service Agency

        Throughout my tenure as State Executive Director for the Virginia Farm Service Agency (FSA), I have met several small and beginning farmers interested in making a living in production agriculture. 

  • Take time before allowing sludge here

    By Ken Burger
    Big Island

        There was a time when we were certain that asbestos was safe. We knew confidently that it was a great resource for insulation: cheap, easy to use and effective.  That was then. Now we know better, because science teaches us truthfully of the dangers that asbestos presents to anyone who inhales the particles.  Who of us has not seen the ads for “mesothelioma?”

  • TDRs: A program for the benefit of farmers

    By David Lowry
    Moneta

        The Bedford farming community is missing out on a great opportunity of support.

  • Defeated conservatives cry at C-PAC

    If you wanted to be reminded again of why Republicans lost the presidential election last year, all you had to do last week was watch this C-PAC thing they do every year.
        The Conservative Political Action Conference, it’s actually called, and, well, it’s always good for a laugh in my part of the world.
        But if you’re a good Republican who remembers a better party in earlier days, what you saw on display was indeed enough to make you cry.

  • Making sure we feel the pain

        Were you planning to go to the United States Air Force’s Rhythm In Blue Jazz Ensemble concert at Liberty High School last Saturday? Too bad if you were. It was canceled, and that had nothing to do with lack of public support. Rhythm In Blue’s performances are so popular that more than 500 people turned out to hear them when they came to Bedford last year. This performance, as well as the rest of the performances in Rhythm In Blue’s spring tour, were canceled due to the sequester.

  • Opportunity lost

        Last week the Bedford County School Board voted to spend an additional $750,000 to hire seven more teachers to help with secondary school programs as well as eight teachers to work in schools that are currently Accredited with Warning.
        Those appear to be needed areas to shore up some trouble spots in the system.

  • Bedford Area Habitat for Humanity celebrates with first homeowner

        Linda Richie has come a long way in the past 25 years.

        In the fall of 1987, Richie found herself in what one would call a less than desirable situation.  Living in Washington, DC, Richie was separated from her husband and homeless, with three small children. 
        But instead of feeling sorry for herself, she decided that her family deserved better and put her mind to making things right.