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Columns

  • Promoting STEM education

    Whether it’s a computer at the office, streaming movies at home, or a navigation system in the car, technology plays a major role in many of our lives these days. The demand for students educated in engineering and technology continues to rise in the United States, but part of the challenge is how to engage students in these subjects and further their understanding of these valuable skills.

     

  • Deciding the future of Medicaid in Va.

    By Delegate Terry Austin
    19th District

    Budget
        Debate on the budget began this week in the General Assembly. Many important issues will be decided through the budget this year. Perhaps the most important topic that we will discuss as a part of the budget is the future of Medicaid. The budget will eventually go into a conference with six members of both the House and the Senate who will help to find a compromise. I encourage you to follow along as we continue to discuss amendments to the budget.

    Important Bills

  • Potential for budget stalemate exists

        Capitol Square was busy this week, with both the House and the Senate unveiling – and ultimately approving – their respective versions of Virginia’s biennial budget.  In even-numbered years, the General Assembly is responsible for approving a two-year spending plan for the Commonwealth.

  • Because of Medicaid expansion, I didn’t support the Senate budget

    Senator Steve Newman
    23rd District

        Virginia’s Capitol enjoyed warmer temperatures this week, while inside the Capitol the Senate of Virginia and the House of Delegates unveiled their respective plans to the Commonwealth’s two-year budget. 

  • Waste, fraud and abuse...really?

    I have tremendous respect for the Virginia General Assembly, given that it is the oldest deliberative body in the history of the world, and that I am a native Virginian.
        Having said that, it is almost always a disappointment for those who hold a progressive political philosophy. That’s because of its resemblance to the Congress in Washington.

  • The last straw

        I want to compliment Rick Howell for his well written column in last week’s paper. Of course, I don’t agree with his conclusion about George W. Bush, but the column was indeed a good opinion piece.
        Nevertheless, it does have a two factual points that I would like to correct.

  • Honoring the sacrifices of our nation’s veterans

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

     

  • Honoring the sacrifices of America’s heroes

    The soldiers who stormed the beaches of Normandy on June 6, 1944, saw some of the most intense fighting of World War II.  Among them on D-Day was Sergeant Robert L. Sales of Madison Heights, a member of the Virginia National Guard Company B, 116th Infantry.   After coming under fierce attack in the first wave of the invasion, Mr. Sales made his way to the seawall.  He was the only man from his landing craft to survive the landing and went on to continue fighting on the front lines.

  • Differing budget plans could lead to lengthy session

    Senator Steve Newman
    23rd District

        On Feb-ruary 11, “Crossover,” all Senate bills crossed over to the House of Delegates and vice versa, just in time for a snow storm to blow through Richmond. As temperatures hovered around freezing outside, inside the Capitol the full Senate reviewed many of the most controversial bills of this Session.

  • Crossover week

        Any optimism that winter might be winding down was dashed this week, as Richmond got socked with two days of snow.  The inclement weather was sufficient to keep many of the General Assembly Building’s usual inhabitants at home.  With very few exceptions though, legislators were in their seats for session every day.